York in the 1960s

Author: Paul Chrystal
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445640961
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
As the fifties faded away, sixties style swept York into the modern age.

New York 1930

Author: Robert A. M. Stern
Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications
ISBN: 9780847830961
Format: PDF
Download Now
Highly esteemed by architects and New York history enthusiasts, 'New York 1930' focuses on the development of many of the landmark structures and the built environment of New York, including the parks, highways, and entertainment districts.

City Boy

Author: Edmund White
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9781408804438
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
A memoir of the social and sexual lives of New York City's cultural and intellectual in-crowd in the tumultuous 1970s, from the acclaimed author Edmund White.

The Ungovernable City

Author: Vincent Cannato
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780786749935
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Vincent Cannato takes us back to the time when John Lindsay stunned New York with his liberal Republican agenda, WASP sensibility, and movie-star good looks. With peerless authority, Cannato explores how Lindsay Liberalism failed to save New York, and, in the opinion of many, left it worse off than it was in the mid-1960's.

All Poets Welcome

Author: Daniel Kane
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520936430
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
This landmark book, together with its accompanying CD, captures the heady excitement of the vibrant, irreverent poetry scene of New York's Lower East Side in the 1960s. Drawing from personal interviews with many of the participants, from unpublished letters, and from rare sound recordings, Daniel Kane brings together for the first time the people, political events, and poetic roots that coalesced into a highly influential community. From the poetry-reading venues of the early sixties, such as those at the Les Deux Mégots and Le Metro coffeehouses to The Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church, a vital forum for poets to this day, Kane traces the history of this literary renaissance, showing how it was born from a culture of publicly performed poetry. The Lower East Side in the sixties proved foundational in American verse culture, a defining era for the artistic and political avant-garde. The voices and works of John Ashbery, Amiri Baraka, Charles Bernstein, Bill Berkson, Ted Berrigan, Kenneth Koch, Bernadette Mayer, Ron Padgett, Denise Levertov, Paul Blackburn, Frank O'Hara, and many others enliven these pages, and the thirty five-track CD includes recordings of several of the poets reading from their work in the sixties and seventies. The Lower East Side's cafes, coffeehouses, and salons brought together poets of various aesthetic sensibilities, including writers associated with the so-called New York School, Beats, Black Mountain, Deep Image, San Francisco Renaissance, Umbra, and others. Kane shows that the significance for literary history of this loosely defined community of poets and artists lies in part in its reclaiming an orally centered poetic tradition, adapted specifically to open up the possibilities for an aesthetically daring, playful poetics and a politics of joy and resistance.

The Help

Author: Kathryn Stockett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0425245136
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Limited and persecuted by racial divides in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, three women, including an African-American maid, her sassy and chronically unemployed friend and a recently graduated white woman, team up for a clandestine project against a backdrop of the budding civil rights era. Includes reading-group guide. Reissue. A #1 best-selling novel.

The Sixties

Author: Arthur Marwick
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1448205425
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
If the World Wars defined the first half of the twentieth century, the sixties defined the second half, providing the pivot on which modern times have turned. From popular music to individual liberties, the tastes and convictions of the Western world are indelibly stamped with the impact of that tumultuous decade. Now one of the world's foremost historians provides the definitive look at this momentous time. Framing the sixties as a period stretching from 1958 to 1974, Arthur Marwick argues that this long decade ushered in nothing less than a cultural revolution--one that raged most clearly in the United States, Britain, France, and Italy. Writing with wit and verve, he brilliantly recaptures the events and movements that shaped our lives: the rise of a youth subculture across the West; the impact of post Beat novels and New Wave cinema; the sit ins and marches of the civil rights movement; Britain's surprising rise to leadership in fashion and music; the emerging storm over Vietnam; the Paris student rising of 1968; the new concern for poverty; the growing force of feminism and the gay rights movement; and much more. As Marwick unfolds his vivid narrative, he illuminates this remarkable era--both its origins and its impact. He concludes that it was a time that saw great leaps forward in the arts, in civil rights, and in many other areas of society and politics. But the decade also left deep divisions still felt today. Written with tremendous force of insight and narrative power, The Sixties promises to be the single most important account of the single most important decade of our times.

The Third World in the Global 1960s

Author: Samantha Christiansen
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857455737
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Decades after the massive student protest movements that consumed much of the world, the 1960s remain a significant subject of scholarly inquiry. While important work has been done regarding radical activism in the United States and Western Europe, events in what is today known as the Global South-Asia, Africa, and Latin America-have yet to receive the requisite attention they deserve. This volume inserts the Third World into the study of the 1960s by examining the local and international articulations of youth protest in various geographical, social, and cultural arenas. Rejecting the notion that the Third World existed on the periphery, it situates the events of the 1960s in a more inclusive context, building a richer, more nuanced understanding of the Global 1960s that better reflects the dynamism of the period. Samantha Christiansen is an instructor at Northeastern University. Her research interests focus on youth and student mobilizations in South Asia and Europe and international Left politics. She has also taught at Independent University Bangladesh. Zachary A. Scarlett is an instructor at Northeastern University specializing in modern Chinese history and the history of radical social movements in the twentieth century. His work examines the ways in which Chinese students imagined and co-opted global narratives during the Cultural Revolution.

Racial Formation in the United States

Author: Michael Omi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135127514
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Twenty years since the publication of the Second Edition and more than thirty years since the publication of the original book, Racial Formation in the United States now arrives with each chapter radically revised and rewritten by authors Michael Omi and Howard Winant, but the overall purpose and vision of this classic remains the same: Omi and Winant provide an account of how concepts of race are created and transformed, how they become the focus of political conflict, and how they come to shape and permeate both identities and institutions. The steady journey of the U.S. toward a majority nonwhite population, the ongoing evisceration of the political legacy of the early post-World War II civil rights movement, the initiation of the ‘war on terror’ with its attendant Islamophobia, the rise of a mass immigrants rights movement, the formulation of race/class/gender ‘intersectionality’ theories, and the election and reelection of a black President of the United States are some of the many new racial conditions Racial Formation now covers.

York College

Author: Tim McNeese
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439647941
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
The dream of York College involved hundreds of people--its reality has touched the lives of thousands. Born in a small town on the rolling plains of Nebraska in 1890, the United Brethren Church and citizens of York established York College on an empty expanse of prairie called East Hill. Its earliest classes, offered in rented rooms above a dry goods store on the town square, established the foundations of a Christian college. The institution grew as buildings arrived with each passing decade. These brick-and-mortar symbols of the college's progress include Old Main, Hulitt Conservatory of Music, Alumni Library, and Middlebrook Hall. When a tragic fire engulfed the school's venerable Old Main in 1951, York College was pulled from the ashes as a second group of believers took the institution's reins. The Churches of Christ determined to continue the dream, standing on the shoulders of those who had come before them.