We Are Left without a Father Here

Author: Eileen J. Suárez Findlay
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822376113
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
We Are Left without a Father Here is a transnational history of working people's struggles and a gendered analysis of populism and colonialism in mid-twentieth-century Puerto Rico. At its core are the thousands of agricultural workers who, at the behest of the Puerto Rican government, migrated to Michigan in 1950 to work in the state's sugar beet fields. The men expected to earn enough income to finally become successful breadwinners and fathers. To their dismay, the men encountered abysmal working conditions and pay. The migrant workers in Michigan and their wives in Puerto Rico soon exploded in protest. Chronicling the protests, the surprising alliances that they created, and the Puerto Rican government's response, Eileen J. Suárez Findlay explains that notions of fatherhood and domesticity were central to Puerto Rican populist politics. Patriarchal ideals shaped citizens' understandings of themselves, their relationship to Puerto Rican leaders and the state, as well as the meanings they ascribed to U.S. colonialism. Findlay argues that the motivations and strategies for transnational labor migrations, colonial policies, and worker solidarities are all deeply gendered.

50 Events that Shaped Latino History An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic 2 volumes

Author: Lilia Fernández
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440837635
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
What are the historical events most key to shaping Latino culture? This book provides detailed and broad coverage of the 50 most pivotal developments across more than 500 years' time that have shaped the Latino experience, offering primary sources, biographies of notable figures, and suggested readings for further research. • Offers scholarly analysis of critical events in Latino/a history while also providing in-depth primary sources, biographies, and evidence that provide additional historical perspective • Represents an invaluable reference tool for students doing research papers, seeking accessibly written background information, or simply wanting to learn more about Latinos in the United States • Written by expert contributors with specialties in a variety of key fields—media, politics, history, and popular culture • Supplies breadth and depth on significant events that have shaped the Latino experience for the past five centuries

Toward a Latino a Biblical Interpretation

Author: Francisco Lozada Jr.
Publisher: SBL Press
ISBN: 0884142698
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Engage an interdisciplinary approach In Toward a Latino/a Biblical Interpretation Francisco Lozada Jr. explores the complex and diverse issues related to Latino/a biblical interpretation. After laying the theoretical foundation, he offers three sample readings of biblical texts to lead readers through the intricacy of interpretation that has historically and culturally surrounded understanding what it means to do Latino/a biblical interpretation. Throughout, Lozada attempts to work out various strategies that Latinos/as have employed to read biblical texts. He argues that Latino/a biblical interpretation is concerned with identity and belongingness with a goal of transforming/liberating the Latino/a community. Features An introduction to what it means to do Latino/a biblical interpretation A demonstration of three different reading strategies (correlation, dialogical, and ideological) that Latinos/as employ in reading biblical texts An exploration of whether one has to be Latino/a to do Latino/a biblical interpretation

Linked Labor Histories

Author: Aviva Chomsky
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082238891X
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Exploring globalization from a labor history perspective, Aviva Chomsky provides historically grounded analyses of migration, labor-management collaboration, and the mobility of capital. She illuminates the dynamics of these movements through case studies set mostly in New England and Colombia. Taken together, the case studies offer an intricate portrait of two regions, their industries and workers, and the myriad links between them over the long twentieth century, as well as a new way to conceptualize globalization as a long-term process. Chomsky examines labor and management at two early-twentieth-century Massachusetts factories: one that transformed the global textile industry by exporting looms around the world, and another that was the site of a model program of labor-management collaboration in the 1920s. She follows the path of the textile industry from New England, first to the U.S. South, and then to Puerto Rico, Japan, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and Colombia. She considers how towns in Rhode Island and Massachusetts began to import Colombian workers as they struggled to keep their remaining textile factories going. Most of the workers eventually landed in service jobs: cleaning houses, caring for elders, washing dishes. Focusing on Colombia between the 1960s and the present, Chomsky looks at the Urabá banana export region, where violence against organized labor has been particularly acute, and, through a discussion of the AFL-CIO’s activities in Colombia, she explores the thorny question of U.S. union involvement in foreign policy. In the 1980s, two U.S. coal mining companies began to shift their operations to Colombia, where they opened two of the largest open-pit coal mines in the world. Chomsky assesses how different groups, especially labor unions in both countries, were affected. Linked Labor Histories suggests that economic integration among regions often exacerbates regional inequalities rather than ameliorating them.

Imposing Decency

Author: Eileen Findlay
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822323969
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
The interrelationship between sexuality and national identity during Puerto Rico’s transition from Spanish to U.S. colonialism.

Ambassadors of the Working Class

Author: Ernesto Semán
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822372959
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
In 1946 Juan Perón launched a populist challenge to the United States, recruiting an army of labor activists to serve as worker attachés at every Argentine embassy. By 1955, over five hundred would serve, representing the largest presence of blue-collar workers in the foreign service of any country in history. A meatpacking union leader taught striking workers in Chicago about rising salaries under Perón. A railroad motorist joined the revolution in Bolivia. A baker showed Soviet workers the daily caloric intake of their Argentine counterparts. As Ambassadors of the Working Class shows, the attachés' struggle against US diplomats in Latin America turned the region into a Cold War battlefield for the hearts of the working classes. In this context, Ernesto Semán reveals, for example, how the attachés' brand of transnational populism offered Fidel Castro and Che Guevara their last chance at mass politics before their embrace of revolutionary violence. Fiercely opposed by Washington, the attachés’ project foundered, but not before US policymakers used their opposition to Peronism to rehearse arguments against the New Deal's legacies.

The New Parapolice

Author: George Rigakos
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802084385
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Rigakos argues that for-profit policing and security companies adopt many of the tactics and functions of the public police, and are less distinguishable from the latter than has been previously assumed in the criminological literature.

Global Care Work

Author: Lise Widding Isaksen
Publisher: Nordic Academic Press
ISBN: 9185509485
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
This is a unique study of gender and migration. Written by researchers from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, this anthology brings the Nordic example to the international debate on how globalisation affects and commercialises women's traditional work. The authors uncover some uncomfortable facts about new ethnic hierarchies, social class and gender discrimination in their countries. The Nordic societies have a long history of active policies on gender equality and social welfare for all. But today families can outsource' gender equality conflicts to the global market, and on a national level the authorities can use migration policy to adjust to the needs of the labour market. The authors present empirical research on the lives of care workers, sex workers and au pairs, their families, and the social and legal migration regulations. Global Care Work critically examines the effects of new migration patterns and globalisation on the egalitarian ideologies in the Nordic countries. The book makes essential reading for those interested in migration, care work and gender issues.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674037649
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.

Cold War Encounters in US Occupied Okinawa

Author: Mire Koikari
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316352226
Format: PDF
Download Now
In this innovative and engaging study, Mire Koikari recasts the US occupation of Okinawa as a startling example of Cold War cultural interaction in which women's grassroots activities involving homes and homemaking played a pivotal role in reshaping the contours of US and Japanese imperialisms. Drawing on insights from studies of gender, Asia, America and postcolonialism, Koikari analyzes how the occupation sparked domestic education movements in Okinawa, mobilizing an assortment of women - home economists, military wives, club women, university students and homemakers - from the US, Okinawa and mainland Japan. These women went on to pursue a series of activities to promote 'modern domesticity' and build 'multicultural friendship' amidst intense militarization on the islands. As these women took their commitment to domesticity and multiculturalism onto the larger terrain of the Pacific, they came to articulate the complex intertwinement of gender, race, domesticity, empire and transnationality that existed during the Cold War.