The Formative Period of American Capitalism

Author: Daniel Gaido
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134222017
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Applying certain Marxist categories of analysis to the study of American history, the central thesis of this outstanding book is that the main peculiarity of American historical development was the almost direct transition from a colonial to an imperialist economy. Expertly dealing with such topics as: * the American Revolution and the Civil War against the background of the European bourgeois revolutions * the influence of the Western land tenure system on the process of capital accumulation * the passage from plantation slavery to sharecropping in the South and its legacy of racism * the transition to imperialism towards the end of the nineteenth century * the rise of the labour movement and the main American socialist organizations up to the end of the First World War. A valuable resource for postgraduate students and researchers of business studies and American studies, Gaido’s text will undoubtedly find a place on the bookshelves of many.

Capitalism and Its Economics

Author: Douglas Dowd
Publisher: Pluto Press
ISBN: 9780745322797
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This classic book is an ideal introduction to economic thought and the dominance of capitalism, ideal for students of economic theory and history. Now thoroughly revised and updated, this new edition includes a new preface and an additional chapter by the author. Analysing the relationship between economic thought and capitalism from 1750 to the present, Douglas Dowd examines the dynamic interaction of two processes: the historical realities of capitalism and the evolution of economic theory. He demonstrates that the study of economics celebrates capitalism in ways that make it necessary to classify economic science as pure ideology. A thoroughly modern history, this book shows how economics has become ideology. A radical critic of capitalism, Dowd surveys its detrimental impact across the globe and throughout history. The book includes biographical sketches and brief analyses of the major proponents and critics of capitalism throughout history, including Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Thorstein Veblen, Rosa Luxemburg, John Maynard Keynes, Paul Samuelson, Milton Friedman, and Eric Hobsbawm.

Blues for America

Author: Douglas Fitzgerald Dowd
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780853459828
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Blues for America is a scholar's deft survey of everything that happened between the 1920s and the 1990s-depressions, repressions, segregation, and wars-and the resistance that arose to each in turn, related with surprising wit and an amazingly gracious turn of phrase. And by weaving in bits of autobiography, Dowd has given us much more." --Barbara Ehrenreich

A People s History of the United States

Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317325303
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

The Moral Economists

Author: Tim Rogan
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888026
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A fresh look at how three important twentieth-century British thinkers viewed capitalism through a moral rather than material lens What’s wrong with capitalism? Answers to that question today focus on material inequality. Led by economists and conducted in utilitarian terms, the critique of capitalism in the twenty-first century is primarily concerned with disparities in income and wealth. It was not always so. The Moral Economists reconstructs another critical tradition, developed across the twentieth century in Britain, in which material deprivation was less important than moral or spiritual desolation. Tim Rogan focuses on three of the twentieth century’s most influential critics of capitalism—R. H. Tawney, Karl Polanyi, and E. P. Thompson. Making arguments about the relationships between economics and ethics in modernity, their works commanded wide readerships, shaped research agendas, and influenced public opinion. Rejecting the social philosophy of laissez-faire but fearing authoritarianism, these writers sought out forms of social solidarity closer than individualism admitted but freer than collectivism allowed. They discovered such solidarities while teaching economics, history, and literature to workers in the north of England and elsewhere. They wrote histories of capitalism to make these solidarities articulate. They used makeshift languages of “tradition” and “custom” to describe them until Thompson patented the idea of the “moral economy.” Their program began as a way of theorizing everything economics left out, but in challenging utilitarian orthodoxy in economics from the outside, they anticipated the work of later innovators inside economics. Examining the moral cornerstones of a twentieth-century critique of capitalism, The Moral Economists explains why this critique fell into disuse, and how it might be reformulated for the twenty-first century.