University Laboratory Preschools

Author: James Elicker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317688155
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume is a collection of articles that showcase new research that is emerging from laboratory schools, guided by principles of applied developmental science. In the 1920's, new university laboratory preschools ushered in a modern era of child development research. Campus preschools with a research mission were home to seminal studies of children's play and age-related changes in children's abilities. They produced data about normative child development, along with evidence-based practical advice for teachers and parents. Now, nearly 100 years later, lab schools are still thriving in many colleges and universities as centers of research, education and care for young children, support for families, and practical education for students and teachers of young children. However, with tightening higher education budgets and changing research agendas, many lab schools are struggling to focus and balance these research, education, and service missions. The chapter authors illustrate a variety of ways that faculty and laboratory school early childhood educators are collaborating to do research to address critical issues in the early childhood field, including the preparation of the next generation of early childhood professionals. This book was originally published as a special issue of Early Education and Development.

Laboratory Schools

Author: Lori E. Arnold-Grine
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Abstract: School reform is changing and expanding the notion of early childhood. State content learning standards now exist for preschool-age children. Thus, teachers must be prepared to teach at the preschool level, and teacher training programs must adapt to prepare quality preschool teachers. Field experiences are key components of teacher training programs, so it is important that they include well-organized experiences at the preschool level. Laboratory preschools offer the elements of proximity to universities and the opportunity to connect theory to practice. Lab preschools provide models of best practice, an important component of education that also serves societal interests. Exemplary models for preschool teacher training can inform educational practice and improve the field of teacher education. The purpose of this study is to show the effectiveness of preschool teacher training in a laboratory preschool setting. This study emphasizes the need for highly qualified teachers for the youngest learners. It shows that hands-on experiences and observation, key components of early childhood education, are readily accessible in a lab preschool setting. Theory to practice is actualized in the lab preschool setting if used for teaching training. This study will address what the use of lab preschools for the training of teachers can do for the early childhood field. This description of laboratory preschools with their three-fold mission will show ways to improve field experience offerings for early childhood teacher training.

Preschool Education in America

Author: Barbara Beatty
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300072730
Format: PDF
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This comprehensive history describes policies and programs for the education of three-, four-, and five-year-olds in the United States since the colonial era. It also traces efforts to make preschool education part of the public school system and shows why these efforts have been rejected, despite increasing evidence that preschools are beneficial for all young children. 24 illustrations.

Preschool in Three Cultures

Author: Joseph Jay Tobin
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300048124
Format: PDF, ePub
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Compares preschool education in the three countries, discusses how child care reflects social change and considers the issues of freedom, creativity, and discipline

Continuity in Children s Worlds

Author: Melissa M. Jozwiak
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774936
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“Offers hope through its rich and abundant examples of teachers, parents, and others who care for young children mindfully taking the time to address issues of continuity in everyday life.” —From the Foreword by Beth Blue Swadener, Arizona State University “After reading this book, it is not possible to think about these ideas simplistically again.” —Virginia Casper, Bank Street College of Education “This examination gives voice to an important but often unexamined issue in early childhood education.” —Christopher P. Brown, The University of Texas at Austin Children’s experiences when they transition from home to school, from classroom to classroom, and from school to school raise issues of continuity that permeate every aspect of early childhood education. This book uses practitioner stories to investigate beliefs about continuity and discontinuity and how these beliefs are enacted in contexts for young children from birth to age 8. The authors examine a range of continuities and discontinuities, including the experiences children, teachers, and families have with programs; the interactions between families and schools; and the ways in which programs and schools relate to one another. They also raise questions about primary caregiving, cultural responsiveness, assessment practices, and congruity between institutions. Discussions of each story include the authors’ interpretations, references to relevant theory, questions for reflection, and implications for intentional and thoughtful practice. Book Features: Represents the first comprehensive volume to unpack the complex topic of continuity. Provides a critical analysis of continuity based on real stories from practitioners and parents.\ Illuminates the work of early childhood educators on the individual, group, organizational, and systems levels. Encourages readers to carefully consider their roles as educators of young children.

Compensatory Education in the Preschool

Author: Mary J. Wright
Publisher: Ypsilanti, Mich. : High/Scope Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Written for a variety of audiences, this volume describes the University of Western Ontario Preschool Project in sufficient detail to permit its replication; findings of formative and summative program evaluations are reported along with research developing new criterion measures of social competence. Begun in 1973, the program was primarily designed to meet the needs of economically disadvantaged preschool-age children in Canada. For comparative purposes, high income/high ability and low income/average ability groups attended the preschool. The children were tested for growth on intellectual and cognitive abilities, problem-solving styles and strategies, and social competence. Findings revealed that all three ability groups made significant gains over time on all measures. Chapter 1 of the present volume provides background information about intervention and research programs. Chapters 2 through 5 provide curriculum materials in the areas of number, classification, and spatial relations. Chapter 6 describes program modifications and special studies conducted in the third and fourth project years. Chapter 7 describes the development of a measure of social competence. Chapters 8 through 11 describe methods and discuss results of the summative evaluation of immediate and long term program impacts. Chapter 12 presents a summary and conclusions. Completing the document is an epilogue viewing the project and related issues from an updated (1983) perspective and exploring implications for social policy. (RH)

Educating Children with Autism

Author: Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309210011
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Autism is a word most of us are familiar with. But do we really know what it means? Children with autism are challenged by the most essential human behaviors. They have difficulty interacting with other people-often failing to see people as people rather than simply objects in their environment. They cannot easily communicate ideas and feelings, have great trouble imagining what others think or feel, and in some cases spend their lives speechless. They frequently find it hard to make friends or even bond with family members. Their behavior can seem bizarre. Education is the primary form of treatment for this mysterious condition. This means that we place important responsibilities on schools, teachers and children's parents, as well as the other professionals who work with children with autism. With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1975, we accepted responsibility for educating children who face special challenges like autism. While we have since amassed a substantial body of research, researchers have not adequately communicated with one another, and their findings have not been integrated into a proven curriculum. Educating Children with Autism outlines an interdisciplinary approach to education for children with autism. The committee explores what makes education effective for the child with autism and identifies specific characteristics of programs that work. Recommendations are offered for choosing educational content and strategies, introducing interaction with other children, and other key areas. This book examines some fundamental issues, including: How children's specific diagnoses should affect educational assessment and planning How we can support the families of children with autism Features of effective instructional and comprehensive programs and strategies How we can better prepare teachers, school staffs, professionals, and parents to educate children with autism What policies at the federal, state, and local levels will best ensure appropriate education, examining strategies and resources needed to address the rights of children with autism to appropriate education. Children with autism present educators with one of their most difficult challenges. Through a comprehensive examination of the scientific knowledge underlying educational practices, programs, and strategies, Educating Children with Autism presents valuable information for parents, administrators, advocates, researchers, and policy makers.

Early Start

Author: Andrew Karch
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472118722
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the United States, preschool education is characterized by the dominance of a variegated private sector and patchy, uncoordinated oversight of the public sector. Tracing the history of the American debate over preschool education, Andrew Karch argues that the current state of decentralization and fragmentation is the consequence of a chain of reactions and counterreactions to policy decisions dating from the late 1960s and early 1970s, when preschool advocates did not achieve their vision for a comprehensive national program but did manage to foster initiatives at both the state and national levels. Over time, beneficiaries of these initiatives and officials with jurisdiction over preschool education have become ardent defenders of the status quo. Today, advocates of greater government involvement must take on a diverse and entrenched set of constituencies resistant to policy change. In his close analysis of the politics of preschool education, Karch demonstrates how to apply the concepts of policy feedback, critical junctures, and venue shopping to the study of social policy.

Handbook of Creativity

Author: John A. Glover
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 147575356X
Format: PDF, ePub
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The motivation underlying our development of a "handbook" of creativity was different from what usually is described by editors of other such volumes. Our sense that a handbook was needed sprang not from a deluge of highly erudite studies calling out for organization, nor did it stem from a belief that the field had become so fully articulated that such a book was necessary to provide summation and reference. Instead, this handbook was conceptualized as an attempt to provide structure and organization for a field of study that, from our perspective, had come to be a large-scale example of a "degenerating" research program (see Brown, Chapter 1). The handbook grew out of a series of discussions that spanned several years. At the heart of most of our interactions was a profound unhappiness with the state of research on creativity. Our consensus was that the number of "good" works published on creativity each year was small and growing smaller. Further, we could not point to a journal, text, or professional organization that was providing leadership for the field in shaping a scientifically sound framework for the development of research programs in creativity. At the same time, we were casting about for a means of honoring a dear friend, E. Paul Torrance. Our decision was that we might best be able to honor Paul and influence research on creativity by developing a handbook designed to challenge traditional perspectives while offering research agendas based on contemporary psychological views.