Troubling the Waters

Author: Jerome E. Morris
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807771694
Format: PDF
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These are turbulent times. We live in a climate of vigorous testing and memorization, so how can we both engage and challenge our children to learn and become thinking citizens in our society? In her invaluable new book, Selma Wassermann takes a step forward from Louis Raths seminal work and gives us some truly helpful answers to this modern dilemma. Using new data from her extensive field work, Wassermann (a co-author of Teaching for Thinking, Second Edition) provides a wealth of innovative classroom strategies that will enable and empower students to grasp the big ideas across virtually all curriculum areas and apply this knowledge to problem solving.

Black Youth Rising

Author: Shawn A. Ginwright
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ginwright examines the role of community based organizations (CBOs) in the lives and development of black urban youth. The author argues that these organizations have the potential to provide a powerful influence in "how young people choose to participate in schooling and civic life." Ginwright bases his observations on a five-year study of a CBO he created in Oakland, California. The book shows readers that the lives of poor, black, urban youth are not quite as determined by locale and income as more deterministic readings have argued, and that there is real hope for positive change in these urban communities.

City Schools and the American Dream

Author: Pedro Noguera
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807774006
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What will it take for urban schools to achieve the kind of academic performance required by new state and national educational standards? How can classroom teachers in city schools help to close the achievement gap? What can restore public confidence in public schools? Pedro Noguera argues that higher standards and more tests, by themselves, will not make low-income urban students any smarter and the schools they attend more successful without substantial investment in the communities in which they live. Drawing on extensive research performed in San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and Richmond, Noguera demonstrates how school and student achievement is influenced by social forces such as demographic change, poverty, drug trafficking, violence, and social inequity. Readers get a detailed glimpse into the lives of teachers and students working "against the odds" to succeed. Noguera sends a strong message to those who would have urban schools “shape up or shut down”: invest in the future of these students and schools, and we can reach the kind of achievement and success that typify only more privileged communities. Public schools are the last best hope for many poor families living in cities across the nation. Noguera gives politicians, policymakers, and the public its own standard to achieve—provide the basic economic and social support so that teachers and students can get the job done! “In this engaging book, Pedro Noguera provides a compelling vision of the problems plaguing urban schools and how to address them. City Schools and the American Dream is replete with insights from a scholar and former activist who makes great use of both personal and professional experiences.” —William Julius Wilson, Harvard University

The Pursuit of Racial and Ethnic Equality in American Public Schools

Author: Kristi L. Bowman
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1628952393
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1954 the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education; ten years later, Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act. These monumental changes in American law dramatically expanded educational opportunities for racial and ethnic minority children across the country. They also changed the experiences of white children, who have learned in increasingly diverse classrooms. The authors of this commemorative volume include leading scholars in law, education, and public policy, as well as important historical figures. Taken together, the chapters trace the narrative arc of school desegregation in the United States, beginning in California in the 1940s, continuing through Brown v. Board, the Civil Rights Act, and three important Supreme Court decisions about school desegregation and voluntary integration in 1974, 1995, and 2007. The authors also assess the status of racial and ethnic equality in education today and consider the viability of future legal and policy reform in pursuit of the goals of Brown v. Board. This remarkable collection of voices in conversation with one another lays the groundwork for future discussions about the relationship between law and educational equality, and ultimately for the creation of new public policy. A valuable reference for scholars and students alike, this dynamic text is an important contribution to the literature by an outstanding group of authors.

Children s Human Rights and Public Schooling in the United States

Author: Julia Hall
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462091978
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Promotion Text for Children’s Human Rights and Public Schooling in the United States Julia Hall The United States tends to portray itself as a human rights leader. However, human rights concerns are confronted everyday by people in this democracy, including children. The purpose of this volume is to bring attention to the fact that against the backdrop of neoliberal expansion, serious human rights violations are taking place among children everywhere, including in the US. The daily struggles among groups of school children in the US are specifically considered here, such as children who are sorted by race, homeless children, transient children, child refugees, children as targeted by human traffickers, and/or child migrant workers. As the economy continues to constrict, more and more young people find themselves struggling to grow up on these razor thin margins of survival. Given current economic arrangements, such margins are widening. The definition of “children’s human rights” as understood in this analysis is taken directly from the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child [CRC]. Here emphasis is placed on ways in which the CRC could be used to serve more effectively the needs of the most vulnerable populations of school-age children in the US and elsewhere. Public schools could be the very place where children come to understand they have rights. Unfortunately, many children do not get this information. Instead the protections stated in the CRC and the realities of the lives of so many children are often worlds apart. This volume sets out to be a part of changing this.

Jim Crow s Children

Author: Peter Irons
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440626502
Format: PDF, ePub
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Peter Irons, acclaimed historian and author of A People History of the Supreme Court, explores of one of the supreme court's most important decisions and its disappointing aftermath In 1954 the U.S. Supreme Court sounded the death knell for school segregation with its decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. So goes the conventional wisdom. Weaving together vivid portraits of lawyers and such judges as Thurgood Marshall and Earl Warren, sketches of numerous black children throughout history whose parents joined lawsuits against Jim Crow schools, and gripping courtroom drama scenes, Irons shows how the erosion of the Brown decision—especially by the Court’s rulings over the past three decades—has led to the “resegregation” of public education in America.

Black Elk Speaks

Author: John G. Neihardt
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438425406
Format: PDF
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The famous story of the Lakota healer and visionary, Nicholas Black Elk.

Integration Interrupted

Author: Karolyn Tyson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199793018
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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An all-too-popular explanation for why black students aren't doing better in school is their own use of the "acting white" slur to ridicule fellow blacks for taking advanced classes, doing schoolwork, and striving to earn high grades. Carefully reconsidering how and why black students have come to equate school success with whiteness, Integration Interrupted argues that when students understand race to be connected with achievement, it is a powerful lesson conveyed by schools, not their peers. Drawing on over ten years of ethnographic research, Karolyn Tyson shows how equating school success with "acting white" arose in the aftermath of Brown v. Board of Education through the practice of curriculum tracking, which separates students for instruction, ostensibly by ability and prior achievement. Only in very specific circumstances, when black students are drastically underrepresented in advanced and gifted classes, do anxieties about "the burden of acting white" emerge. Racialized tracking continues to define the typical American secondary school, but it goes unremarked, except by the young people who experience its costs and consequences daily. The rich narratives in Integration Interrupted throw light on the complex relationships underlying school behaviors and convincingly demonstrate that the problem lies not with students, but instead with how we organize our schools.