The Woman Warrior

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307759334
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In her award-winning book The Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston created an entirely new form—an exhilarating blend of autobiography and mythology, of world and self, of hot rage and cool analysis. First published in 1976, it has become a classic in its innovative portrayal of multiple and intersecting identities—immigrant, female, Chinese, American. As a girl, Kingston lives in two confounding worlds: the California to which her parents have immigrated and the China of her mother’s “talk stories.” The fierce and wily women warriors of her mother’s tales clash jarringly with the harsh reality of female oppression out of which they come. Kingston’s sense of self emerges in the mystifying gaps in these stories, which she learns to fill with stories of her own. A warrior of words, she forges fractured myths and memories into an incandescent whole, achieving a new understanding of her family’s past and her own present.

China Men

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307787818
Format: PDF, ePub
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The author chronicles the lives of three generations of Chinese men in America, woven from memory, myth and fact. Here's a storyteller's tale of what they endured in a strange new land. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Maxine Hong Kingston s The Woman Warrior

Author: Sau-ling Cynthia Wong
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195116540
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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With the continued expansion of the literary canon, multicultural works of modern literary fiction and autobiography have assumed an increasing importance for students and scholars of American literature. This exciting new series assembles key documents and criticism concerning these works that have so recently become central components of the American literature curriculum. Each casebook will reprint documents relating to the work's historical context and reception, present the best in critical essays, and when possible, feature an interview of the author. The series will provide, for the first time, an accessible forum in which readers can come to a fuller understanding of these contemporary masterpieces and the unique aspects of American ethnic, racial, or cultural experience that they so ably portray. This case book presents a thought-provoking overview of critical debates surrounding The Woman Warrior, perhaps the best known Asian American literary work. The essays deal with such issues as the reception by various interpretive communities, canon formation, cultural authenticity, fictionality in autobiography, and feminist and poststructuralist subjectivity. The eight essays are supplemented an interview with the author and a bibliography.

The Fifth Book of Peace

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307428575
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A long time ago in China, there existed three Books of Peace that proved so threatening to the reigning powers that they had them burned. Many years later Maxine Hong Kingston wrote a Fourth Book of Peace, but it too was burned--in the catastrophic Berkeley-Oakland Hills fire of 1991, a fire that coincided with the death of her father. Now in this visionary and redemptive work, Kingston completes her interrupted labor, weaving fiction and memoir into a luminous meditation on war and peace, devastation and renewal. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Tripmaster Monkey

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307787907
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Driven by his dream to write and stage an epic stage production of interwoven Chinese novelsWittman Ah Sing, a Chinese-American hippie in the late '60s. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Street

Author: Ann Petry
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547525346
Format: PDF, ePub
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THE STREET tells the poignant, often heartbreaking story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman, and her spirited struggle to raise her son amid the violence, poverty, and racial dissonance of Harlem in the late 1940s. Originally published in 1946 and hailed by critics as a masterwork, The Street was Ann Petry's first novel, a beloved bestseller with more than a million copies in print. Its haunting tale still resonates today.

Hawai i One Summer

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Diversion Books
ISBN: 162681404X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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From the National Book Award-winning author of classics like THE WOMAN WARRIOR comes a stirring collection of essays, celebrating memory, history, and island tradition. In these eleven thought-provoking pieces, originally gathered in a limited, hand-printed edition, acclaimed writer and feminist Maxine Hong Kingston tells stories of Hawai'i "piece by piece, and hope that the sum praises her." The essays provide readers with a generous sampling of Kingston's signature: her exquisite angle of vision, her balanced and clear-sighted prose, and her stunning insight that awakens one to a wealth of knowledge.

Conversations with Maxine Hong Kingston

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781578060597
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In 1976 Maxine Hong Kingston burst into American literature with the publication of The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts. Since then her subsequent works--China Men (1980) and Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book (1989)--have startled readers with their complex projections of Asian-American life as a bi-cultural and bilingual adventure filled with contemporary confusions and ancient legends, inherited values, and new loyalties. Kingston has written of her family upbringing in Stockton, California, of the stories her mother told her as advice and warning, of her father's illegal arrival in the United States, of the exploits of grandfathers who worked on the rails in California, of San Francisco street life in the 1960s, and of traditional Chinese legends. Whatever her subject, she claims America for herself and other Asian Americans whose histories are an essential part of the larger American tapestry. In this collection of interviews Kingston talks about her life, her writing, and her objectives. From the first, her books have hovered along the hazy line between fiction and nonfiction, memoir and imagination. As she answers her critics and readers, she both clarifies the differences and exults in the difficulties of distinguishing between the remembered and the re-created. She explains how she worked to bridge her parents' Chinese dialect with American slang, how she learned to explore her inheritance and find new relevance in her mother's "talk stories," and how she developed the complex juxtapositions of myths and memoir that fill her books. Always savvy, often provocative, constantly amused and amusing, Kingston provides a vivid commentary on her writing and offers insight into a body of her work.

Maxine Hong Kingston s The Woman Warrior

Author: Kristin Unger
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640140907
Format: PDF, ePub
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Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts is “assembling [...] a distinct sense of self from the raw material of the lives and imaginations of countless other women of Chinese descent, a self-hood that must separate itself to appreciate the collective fabric it’s made of, and that is driven, further, to address the world at large.” This term paper discusses the novel The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts written by Maxine Hong Kingston in 1975 and its theme of silence and voicelessness in close connection to the author’s struggle to find her own identity as a Chinese American. I argue that Kingston employs the theme of silence in order to find her own voice as a Chinese woman living in an American society. Her quest starts with the words “’You must not tell anyone,’” but Kingston does exactly the opposite of this by telling her readers stories which were not to be told: of her dead aunt, her mother’s Chinese village, another aunt, who struggles with life in America, and finally her own struggle in finding her voice, i.e. her identity, within Chinese and American society. Therefore, Kingston is portraying a journey from voicelessness to voice. She begins with depicting “enforced silence” in the first chapter. In the end, the protagonist has overcome her struggle of identity and found her own voice. In addition, Kingston entwines her stories around the motif of translation in order to find her unique self. Altogether, this term paper argues that Maxine Hong Kingston portrays her struggle of finding her own identity by employing the motif of translation in combination with the theme of silence. By doing so Kingston uses language as a tool in order to constitute her own identity. The motif of translation is particularly important because Kingston’s finds her ‘American identity’ through the translation of traditional Chinese stories and myths. In this term paper I will, therefore, discuss the beginnings of Kingston’s silence, as well as the conflict between Chinese tradition and the American way of life in order to support the thesis mentioned above.

I Love a Broad Margin to My Life

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307595331
Format: PDF, ePub
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In her singular voice—humble, elegiac, practical—Maxine Hong Kingston sets out to reflect on aging as she turns sixty-five. Kingston’s swift, effortlessly flowing verse lines feel instantly natural in this fresh approach to the art of memoir, as she circles from present to past and back, from lunch with a writer friend to the funeral of a Vietnam veteran, from her long marriage (“can’t divorce until we get it right. / Love, that is. Get love right”) to her arrest at a peace march in Washington, where she and her "sisters" protested the Iraq war in the George W. Bush years. Kingston embraces Thoreau’s notion of a “broad margin,” hoping to expand her vista: “I’m standing on top of a hill; / I can see everywhichway— / the long way that I came, and the few / places I have yet to go. Treat / my whole life as if it were a day.” On her journeys as writer, peace activist, teacher, and mother, Kingston revisits her most beloved characters: she learns the final fate of her Woman Warrior, and she takes her Tripmaster Monkey, a hip Chinese American, on a journey through China, where he has never been—a trip that becomes a beautiful meditation on the country then and now, on a culture where rice farmers still work in the age-old way, even as a new era is dawning. “All over China,” she writes, “and places where Chinese are, populations / are on the move, going home. That home / where Mother and Father are buried. Doors / between heaven and earth open wide.” Such is the spirit of this wonderful book—a sense of doors opening wide onto an American life of great purpose and joy, and the tonic wisdom of a writer we have come to cherish. From the Hardcover edition.