The New Map of Empire

Author: S. Max Edelson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674972117
Format: PDF, Docs
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After the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War in 1763, British America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Florida Keys, from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, and across new islands in the West Indies. To better rule these vast dominions, Britain set out to map its new territories with unprecedented rigor and precision. Max Edelson's The New Map of Empire pictures the contested geography of the British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and consequences of Britain's imperial ambitions in the generation before the American Revolution. Under orders from King George III to reform the colonies, the Board of Trade dispatched surveyors to map far-flung frontiers, chart coastlines in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sound Florida's rivers, parcel tropical islands into plantation tracts, and mark boundaries with indigenous nations across the continental interior. Scaled to military standards of resolution, the maps they produced sought to capture the essential attributes of colonial spaces-their natural capacities for agriculture, navigation, and commerce-and give British officials the knowledge they needed to take command over colonization from across the Atlantic. Britain's vision of imperial control threatened to displace colonists as meaningful agents of empire and diminished what they viewed as their greatest historical accomplishment: settling the New World. As London's mapmakers published these images of order in breathtaking American atlases, Continental and British forces were already engaged in a violent contest over who would control the real spaces they represented. Accompanying Edelson's innovative spatial history of British America are online visualizations of more than 250 original maps, plans, and charts.

The New Map of Empire

Author: S. Max Edelson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674979017
Format: PDF, ePub
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In 1763 British America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Keys, from the Atlantic to the Mississippi. Using maps that Britain created to control its new lands, Max Edelson pictures the contested geography of the British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and consequences of Britain’s imperial ambitions before the Revolution.

Surveyors of Empire

Author: Stephen J. Hornsby
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773587349
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Using research from both sides of the Atlantic, Stephen Hornsby examines the development of British military cartography in North America during and after the Seven Years War, as well as advancements in military and scientific equipment used in surveying. At the same time, he follows the land speculation of two leading surveyors, Samuel Holland and J.F.W. Des Barres, and the publication history of The Atlantic Neptune. Richly illustrated with images from The Atlantic Neptune and earlier maps, Surveyors of Empire is an insightful account of the relationship between science and imperialism, and the British shaping of the Atlantic world.

The English Conquest of Jamaica

Author: Carla Gardina Pestana
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674737318
Format: PDF, ePub
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Long before sugar and slaves made Jamaica Britain’s most valuable colony, its conquest sparked conflicts with European powers and opened vast tropical spaces to English exploitation. Carla Gardina Pestana captures the moment when Cromwell’s plan to take Spain’s American empire altered his revolutionary state’s engagement with the wider world.

The Social Life of Maps in America 1750 1860

Author: Martin Brückner
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469632616
Format: PDF
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In the age of MapQuest and GPS, we take cartographic literacy for granted. We should not; the ability to find meaning in maps is the fruit of a long process of exposure and instruction. A "carto-coded" America--a nation in which maps are pervasive and meaningful--had to be created. The Social Life of Maps tracks American cartography's spectacular rise to its unprecedented cultural influence. Between 1750 and 1860, maps did more than communicate geographic information and political pretensions. They became affordable and intelligible to ordinary American men and women looking for their place in the world. School maps quickly entered classrooms, where they shaped reading and other cognitive exercises; giant maps drew attention in public spaces; miniature maps helped Americans chart personal experiences. In short, maps were uniquely social objects whose visual and material expressions affected commercial practices and graphic arts, theatrical performances and the communication of emotions. This lavishly illustrated study follows popular maps from their points of creation to shops and galleries, schoolrooms and coat pockets, parlors and bookbindings. Between the decades leading up to the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, early Americans bonded with maps; Martin Bruckner's comprehensive history of quotidian cartographic encounters is the first to show us how.

Entangled Empires

Author: Jorge Canizares-Esguerra
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812249836
Format: PDF
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Entangled Empires emphasizes the connections between the English and Iberian imperial projects. The colonial history of the United States ought to be considered part of the history of colonial Latino-America just as Latin American history should be understood as fundamental to the constitution of the United States.

The First Mapping of America

Author: Alex Johnson
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1786723212
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Britain’s victory in the Seven Years War, just prior to the American Revolution, dramatically enlarged her North American empire. Eager to learn more of its economic and military potential, the British government commissioned an ambitious survey to provide an accurate map of the entire North American empire. Known as the General Survey of British North America, it ranks as one of the most impressive technical achievements of the period. The First Mapping of America tells the story of the Survey, of the spectacular maps and the extraordinary men who created them, and the battles they fought with Crown administrators, governors and wealthy speculators seeking to use the Survey for their own ends. Many maps have not appeared in print before. A vivid and compelling account and a work of outstanding scholarship.

Property and Dispossession

Author: Allan Greer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107160642
Format: PDF, Docs
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Offers a new reading of the history of the colonization of North America and the dispossession of its indigenous peoples.

Ghosts of Empire

Author: Kwasi Kwarteng
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610391217
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Kwasi Kwarteng is the child of parents whose lives were shaped as subjects of the British Empire, first in their native Ghana, then as British immigrants. He brings a unique perspective and impeccable academic credentials to a narrative history of the British Empire, one that avoids sweeping judgmental condemnation and instead sees the Empire for what it was: a series of local fiefdoms administered in varying degrees of competence or brutality by a cast of characters as outsized and eccentric as anything conjured by Gilbert and Sullivan. The truth, as Kwarteng reveals, is that there was no such thing as a model for imperial administration; instead, appointees were schooled in quirky, independent-minded individuality. As a result the Empire was the product not of a grand idea but of often chaotic individual improvisation. The idosyncracies of viceroys and soldier-diplomats who ran the colonial enterprise continues to impact the world, from Kashmir to Sudan, Baghdad to Hong Kong.