The Making of the American Landscape

Author: Michael P. Conzen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317793692
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The only compact yet comprehensive survey of environmental and cultural forces that have shaped the visual character and geographical diversity of the settled American landscape. The book examines the large-scale historical influences that have molded the varied human adaptation of the continent’s physical topography to its needs over more than 500 years. It presents a synoptic view of myriad historical processes working together or in conflict, and illustrates them through their survival in or disappearance from the everyday landscapes of today.

Myth Memory and the Making of the American Landscape

Author: Paul A. Shackel
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 9780813021041
Format: PDF
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"Penetrating insight into the processes by which our collective historical memory is constructed. Through a range of case studies, the authors explore how and why certain landscapes and monuments are intentionally endowed with specific messages, why certain stories are obscured or forgotten, and how collective memories change over time." --James Delle, Franklin and Marshall College The authors in this collection show how the creation of a collective memory of highly visible objects and landscapes is an ongoing struggle, their meanings always being constructed, changed, and challenged. The sites and symbols the authors address are nationally recognized and include a balance of places that illuminate class, ethnic, racial, and historical experiences. Focusing on material culture, they explore the tensions that exist among various groups--elite landowners, the National Park Service, preservationists, minority groups--who compete for control over the interpretation of American public history. CONTENTS Foreword, by Edward T. Linenthal Introduction: The Making of the American Landscape, by Paul A. Shackel Part I: An Exclusionary Past, by Paul A. Shackel 1. Of Saints and Sinners: Mythic Landscapes of the Old and New South, by Audrey J. Horning 2. The Woman Movement: Memorial to Women's Rights Leaders and the Perceived Images of the Women's Movement, by Courtney Workman 3. The Third Battle of Manassas: Power, Identity, and the Forgotten African-American Past, by Erika K. Martin Seibert 4. Remembering a Japanese-American Concentration Camp at Manzanar National Historic Site, by Janice L. Dubel 5. Wounded Knee: The Conflict of Interpretation, by Gail Brown Part II: Commemoration and the Making of a Patriotic Past, by Paul A. Shackel 6. Freeze-Frame, September 17, 1862: A Preservation Battle at Antietam National Battlefield Park, by Martha Temkin 7. The Robert Gould Shaw Memorial: Redefining the Role of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, by Paul A. Shackel 8. Buried in the Rose Garden: Levels of Meaning at Arlington National Cemetery and the Robert E. Lee Memorial, by Laurie Burgess Part III: Nostalgia and the Legitimation of American Heritage, by Paul A. Shackel 9. Authenticity, Legitimation, and Twentieth-Century Tourism: The John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Carriage Roads, Acadia National Park, Maine, by Matthew M. Palus 10. The Birthplace of a Chief: Archaeology and Meaning at George Washington Birthplace National Monument, by Joy Beasley 11. Nostalgia and Tourism: Camden Yards in Baltimore, by Erin Donovan 12. Abraham Lincoln's Birthplace Cabin: The Making of an American Icon, by Dwight T. Pitcaithley Paul A. Shackel, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Maryland, is the author of Archaeology and Created Memory: Public History in a National Park; Culture Change and the New Technology: An Archaeology of the Early American Industrial Era; and Personal Discipline and Material Culture: An Archaeology of Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1870.

Creating Colorado

Author: William Wyckoff
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300071184
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Sprawling Piedmont cities, ghost towns on the plains, earth-toned placitas set against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, mining camps transformed into ski resorts-these are some of the diverse regions in Colorado explored in this fascinating book. Historical geographer William Wyckoff traces the evolution of the state during its formative years from 1860 to 1940, chronicling its changing cultural landscapes, social communities, and connections to a larger America and showing that Colorado has exemplified the unfolding of a complex western environment. Wyckoff discusses how nature, capitalism, a growing federal political presence, and national cultural influences came together to produce a new human geography in Colorado. He explains the ways in which the state's distinctive settlement geographies each took on a special character that persists to the present. He leads the reader through the transformation of the state from wilderness to a distinct region capable of accommodating the diverse needs of ranchers, miners, merchants, farmers, and city dwellers. And he describes how a state created out of cartographic necessity has been given uniqueness and meaning by the people who live there.

Irrigated Eden

Author: Mark Fiege
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295989747
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Irrigation came to the arid West in a wave of optimism about the power of water to make the desert bloom. Mark Fiege�s fascinating and innovative study of irrigation in southern Idaho�s Snake River valley describes a complex interplay of human and natural systems. Using vast quantities of labor, irrigators built dams, excavated canals, laid out farms, and brought millions of acres into cultivation. But at each step, nature rebounded and compromised the intended agricultural order. The result was a new and richly textured landscape made of layer upon layer of technology and intractable natural forces�one that engineers and farmers did not control with the precision they had anticipated. Irrigated Eden vividly portrays how human actions inadvertently helped to create a strange and sometimes baffling ecology. Winner of the Idaho Library Association Book Award, 1999 Winner of the Charles A. Weyerhaeuser Award, Forest History Society, 1999-2000

Spirit of Place

Author: Frederick Turner
Publisher: Shearwater Books
ISBN: 9781559631808
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Award-winning author Frederick Turner examines the lives and careers of nine American authors, the locales they made famous, and the ways in which landscape played a role in the creation of their finest works. "Spirit of Place" is both a testament to the creative genius of nine of America's most important writers and an insightful investigation of the vital role of the physical landscape in the cultural development of the United States.

The Making of the American Landscape

Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 1490274030
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Facts101 is your complete guide to The Making of the American Landscape. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

Mercury and the Making of California

Author: Andrew Scott Johnston
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1457183994
Format: PDF
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Exploring the development of California and the relationship between the built environments of the mercury-mining industry and the emerging ethnic identities and communities in California, Mercury and the Making of California brings mercury to its rightful place alongside gold and silver in their defining roles in the development of the American West. In this pioneering study, Andrew Johnston examines the history of California’s mercury-mining industry—and its defining role in the development of the American West. Mercury was crucial to refining gold and silver; therefore, its production and use were vital to creating and securing power and wealth in the west. The first industrialized mining in California, mercury mining had its own particular organization and structure shaped by powers first formed within the Spanish Empire, transformed by British imperial ambitions, and manipulated by groups made wealthy and powerful by controlling it. In addition, the landscapes of work and camp and the relations among the many groups—Mexicans, Chileans, Spanish, British, Irish, Cornish, American, and Chinese—throughout the industry’s history illustrate the complex history of race and ethnicity in the American West. Combining rich documentary sources with a close examination of the existing physical landscape, Andrew Johnston explores both the detail of everyday work and life in the mines and the larger economic and social structures in which mercury mining was enmeshed, revealing the significance of mercury mining to Western history.

Invisible Gardens

Author: Peter Walker
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262731164
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Invisible Gardens is a composite history of the individuals and firms that defined the field of landscape architecture in America from 1925 to 1975, a period that spawned a significant body of work combining social ideas of enduring value with landscapes and gardens that forged a modern aesthetic. The major protagonists include Thomas Church, Roberto Burle Marx, Isamu Noguchi, Luis Barragan, Daniel Urban Kiley, Stanley White, Hideo Sasaki, Ian McHarg, Lawrence Halprin, and Garrett Eckbo.They were the pioneers of a new profession in America, the first to offer alternatives to the historic landscape and the park tradition, as well as to the suburban sprawl and other unplanned developments of twentieth-century cities and institutions. The work is described against the backdrop of the Great Depression, the Second World War, the postwar recovery, American corporate expansion, and the environmental revolution.The authors look at unbuilt schemes as well as actual gardens, ranging from tiny backyards and play spaces to urban plazas and corporate villas. Some of the projects discussed already occupy a canonical position in modern landscape architecture; others deserve a similar place but are less well known. The result is a record of landscape architecture's cultural contribution - as distinctly different in history, intent, and procedure from its sister fields of architecture and planning - during the years when it was acquiring professional status and struggling to define a modernist aesthetic out of the startling changes in postwar America.

Edges of the Experiment

Author: Hans Gremmen
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789490119263
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Edges of the Experiment' investigates the idyllic notion of the American landscape, showing which elements contribute to the iconic landscape, and at what cost they can be maintained. It describes the thin line between nature and civilisation. How did the landscape evolve, and where are the interfaces between the organic and the artificial world, and do they fail or succeed? 'Edges of the Experiment' is a two-volume publication. Volume one shows over 60 photographs made over a period of ten years by Jongerius. Volume two is a collection of essays about the making of the American Landscape, with texts by Matthew Coolidge, William L. Fox, Hans Gremmen, Taco Hidde Bakker, Mark Pimlott, Warren Techentin, Raymond Frenken and others.

Making in America

Author: Suzanne Berger
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262316846
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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America is the world leader in innovation, but many of the innovative ideas that are hatched in American start-ups, labs, and companies end up going abroad to reach commercial scale. Apple, the superstar of innovation, locates its production in China (yet still reaps most of its profits in the United States). When innovation does not find the capital, skills, and expertise it needs to come to market in the United States, what does it mean for economic growth and job creation? Inspired by the MIT Made in America project of the 1980s, Making in America brings experts from across MIT to focus on a critical problem for the country.MIT scientists, engineers, social scientists, and management experts visited more than 250 firms in the United States, Germany, and China. In companies across America -- from big defense contractors to small machine shops and new technology start-ups -- these experts tried to learn how we can rebuild the industrial landscape to sustain an innovative economy. At each stop, they asked this basic question: "When you have a new idea, how do you get it into the market?" They found gaping holes and missing pieces in the industrial ecosystem. Even in an Internet-connected world, proximity to innovation and users matters for industry. Making in America describes ways to strengthen this connection, including public-private collaborations, new government-initiated manufacturing innovation institutes, and industry/community college projects. If we can learn from these ongoing experiments in linking innovation to production, American manufacturing could have a renaissance.