The Common Scientist of the Seventeenth Century

Author: K Theodore Hoppen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135028532
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Learned societies, such as the Royal Society of London and the Dublin Philosophical Society were a central feature of the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century. This volume shows that a study of the work and membership of these groups is essential before any realistic assessment can be made of the scientific world at this time. Based on a wide range of manuscript and other sources, this book illuminates, by means of an examination of a particular group of natural philosophers, on problems of general interest to all those concerned with the wider aspects of science in this period.

The Cambridge History of Seventeenth century Philosophy

Author: Daniel Garber
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521537209
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Annotation. The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy offers a uniquely comprehensive and authoritative overview of early-modern philosophy written by an international team of specialists. As with previous Cambridge Histories of Philosophy the subject is treated by topic and theme, and since history does not come packaged in neat bundles, the subject is also treated with great temporal flexibility, incorporating frequent reference to medieval and Renaissance ideas. The basic structure of the volumes corresponds to the way an educated seventeenth-century European might have organised the domain of philosophy. Thus, the history of science, religious doctrine, and politics feature very prominently.

Making Instruments Count

Author: Robert Geoffrey William Anderson
Publisher: Variorum
ISBN:
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This collection of essays, bringing together many of the established curators and historians in the field of scientific instruments and ranging widely over their interests, represents a branch of the history of science whose activity, output and significance within the discipline have blossomed in recent years. It is no longer possible to fence off a grand conceptual succession and represent this as the only essence of scientific development. Practices - in discovery, experiment, application and teaching - are integral parts of what science does and are therefore all part of what it is, and instruments were central to each of these varieties of scientific practice. The instrument historian comes in a number of guises - the scholar, the collector, the curator, the dealer - and the discipline is practised in a variety of settings. The university has very different priorities from the salesroom, the museum from the antiques fair, but the challenge of instrument history is to integrate connoisseurship, technical insight and historical sensitivity, while not neglecting the trade institutions and practices of the makers and remaining familiar with instrument populations in both the captivity of museums and the relative freedom of the market-place. This volume is presented to Gerard Turner, who has been at the forefront of promoting instrument studies in recent years. After a twenty-five-year association with the Museum of the History of Science at Oxford, a Visiting Professorship in the History of Scientific Instruments was established for him at the Imperial College, London, in 1988, from where he has been able to increase his research in this field. Gerard Turner has also been, amongst other positions in his distinguished career, the first Chairman of the Scientific Instrument Society, the President of the Royal Microscopical Society and the President of the British Society for the History of Science. In addition, he currently holds the position of Editor of the journal Annals of Science. The volume includes papers on instruments for mathematics, astronomy, navigation, horology, chemistry, physics, optics and medicine, together with studies of the instrument-making trade and reflections on the significance of such work for our understanding of the past.

The Social Life of Coffee

Author: Brian Cowan
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300133502
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What induced the British to adopt foreign coffee-drinking customs in the seventeenth century? Why did an entirely new social institution, the coffeehouse, emerge as the primary place for consumption of this new drink? In this lively book, Brian Cowan locates the answers to these questions in the particularly British combination of curiosity, commerce, and civil society. Cowan provides the definitive account of the origins of coffee drinking and coffeehouse society, and in so doing he reshapes our understanding of the commercial and consumer revolutions in Britain during the long Stuart century. Britain’s virtuosi, gentlemanly patrons of the arts and sciences, were profoundly interested in things strange and exotic. Cowan explores how such virtuosi spurred initial consumer interest in coffee and invented the social template for the first coffeehouses. As the coffeehouse evolved, rising to take a central role in British commercial and civil society, the virtuosi were also transformed by their own invention.

Encyclopedia of the Scientific Revolution

Author: Wilbur Applebaum
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135582556
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With unprecedented current coverage of the profound changes in the nature and practice of science in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe, this comprehensive reference work addresses the individuals, ideas, and institutions that defined culture in the age when the modern perception of nature, of the universe, and of our place in it is said to have emerged. Covering the historiography of the period, discussions of the Scientific Revolution's impact on its contemporaneous disciplines, and in-depth analyses of the importance of historical context to major developments in the sciences, The Encyclopedia of the Scientific Revolution is an indispensible resource for students and researchers in the history and philosophy of science.

Utopianism in Eighteenth century Ireland

Author: Deirdre Ní Chuanacháin
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781782051688
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They move from dialogue to satire, from aisling to polemic, from visions of a golden age, to an imagined Eden far away to realistic discourses of improvement, self-reliance and patriotism. This book explores the varieties of utopianism in eighteenth-century Ireland. Based on what is recoverable and what has been recovered to date, it reveals that a distinct utopianism emerged in the early decades of the eighteenth century based on the improving visions of the Dublin Society, the imperative to improve, the interface between the languages, Irish and English, between the cultures of the Catholic and Protestant communities, and between colonial and anti-colonial writings. Utopianism, beyond all the definitional difficulties, is basically a process, one that is continually being reworked. The philosophy of Irish utopianism of the eighteenth century grew steadily during the subsequent centuries and contributed to the formation of an identifiably modern society in Ireland.

The Germ of an Idea

Author: Margaret DeLacy
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137575298
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Contagionism is an old idea, but gained new life in Restoration Britain. Germ of an Idea considers British contagionism in its religious, social, political and professional context from the Great Plague of London to the adoption of smallpox inoculation. It shows how ideas about contagion changed medicine and the understanding of acute diseases.

The Cambridge History of Eighteenth century Philosophy

Author: Knud Haakonssen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521867429
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This two-volume set presents a comprehensive and up-to-date history of eighteenth-century philosophy. The subject is treated systematically by topic, not by individual thinker, school, or movement, thus enabling a much more historically nuanced picture of the period to be painted.

Evolutionary Theory and Christian Belief

Author: David Lack
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135028303
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Originally published in 1957. This book is concerned with the conflict between "Darwinism" as the Victorians called it, and Christianity, a conflict here re-stated in modern terms because it so vitally affects our understanding of human nature and human values today. The opening chapter describes the historical background. There is a short account of evolution and the argument over Genesis. The importance of natural selection is stressed, and rival theories as to the means of animal evolution are criticised. Discussions follow on whether the course of evolution has been random or determined, on the argument from design, death in nature, the biologist’s methods and the difficulties in evolutionary ethics.