The Architecture of School Improvement

Author: Joseph Murphy
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1483331024
Format: PDF, ePub
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Sound bites of wisdom for successful school improvement This is no ordinary how-to manual. Researcher Joseph Murphy infuses experiences and humor into oft-debated methods of school improvement. School leaders, teachers, and improvement-minded audiences will find a collection of daily reflections that motivate, amuse, and inspire. This book presents more than 70 short, digestible lessons on what works, what doesn’t, and what matters most in the world of high-stakes testing and accountability, such as: Prevention trumps remediation Context always matters School improvement is about layering small gains

Organizing Schools for Improvement

Author: Anthony S. Bryk
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226078019
Format: PDF, Docs
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In 1988, the Chicago public school system decentralized, granting parents and communities significant resources and authority to reform their schools in dramatic ways. To track the effects of this bold experiment, the authors of Organizing Schools for Improvement collected a wealth of data on elementary schools in Chicago. Over a seven-year period they identified one hundred elementary schools that had substantially improved—and one hundred that had not. What did the successful schools do to accelerate student learning? The authors of this illuminating book identify a comprehensive set of practices and conditions that were key factors for improvement, including school leadership, the professional capacity of the faculty and staff, and a student-centered learning climate. In addition, they analyze the impact of social dynamics, including crime, critically examining the inextricable link between schools and their communities. Putting their data onto a more human scale, they also chronicle the stories of two neighboring schools with very different trajectories. The lessons gleaned from this groundbreaking study will be invaluable for anyone involved with urban education.

Connecting Teacher Leadership and School Improvement

Author: Joseph Murphy
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1483304116
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Increase student learning by developing teacher leaders! This is the first book to synthesize theoretical, empirical, and practice-based literature in order to provide a comprehensive look at what is known about teacher leadership and what works to support it. The first part of the book explores the core concepts of teacher leadership, while the second part shows readers how to establish the context in their school or district to cultivate and support teacher leaders. A vital tool for school improvement, this volume covers such important topics as: The principal’s critical role in supporting teacher leadership Cultivating teacher leadership through professional development Overcoming organizational barriers that hinder teacher leadership How teacher leadership can help advance school improvement efforts

How School Leaders Contribute to Student Success

Author: Kenneth Leithwood
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319509802
Format: PDF, Docs
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While considerable evidence indicates that school leaders are able to make important contributions to the success of their students, much less is known about how such contributions are made. This book provides a comprehensive account of research aimed at filling this gap in our knowledge, along with guidelines about how school leaders might use this knowledge for their own school improvement work. Leadership practices known to be effective for improving student success are outlined in the first section of the book while the remaining sections identify four “paths” along which the influence of those practices “flow” to exercise an influence on student success. Each of the Rational, Emotional, Organizational and Family paths are populated by conditions or variables known to have relatively direct effects on student success and also open to influence by effective leadership practices. While the Four Path framework narrows the attention of school leaders to a still-considerable number conditions known to contribute to student success, it leaves school leaders the autonomy to select, for improvement efforts, the sub-set of conditions that make the most sense in their own local circumstances. The approach to leadership described in this book provides evidence-based guidance on what to lead and flexibility on how to lead for purposes of improving student learning.

Creating Instructional Capacity

Author: Joseph Murphy
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 1483385973
Format: PDF, Docs
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Great leaders build stronger foundations using Academic Press School leaders who learn how to apply academic press within a supportive culture will build successful teams to meet today’s standards. This book unpacks essential elements of building instructional capacity or Academic Press through effective management of instruction, curriculum, and assessment. Leaders and change facilitators who read this will: Be reminded how effective instruction works and what forces shape it Understand how powerful assessment ideas can guide successful change Discover secrets to hiring and developing capacity-rich talent Know how to approach and manage curriculum for 21st century outcomes

Designing for Designers Routledge Revivals

Author: Wolfgang F. E. Preiser
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134883498
Format: PDF, ePub
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First published in 2007, this book examines the designs of seventeen architecture and design schools and answers questions such as: How has architectural education evolved and what is its future? Are architectural schools discernible types of designs and what are their effects on those who experience them? What lessons can be learned from evaluations of recently completed school buildings and what guidance do they provide for the design of future ones? Included in the multiple approaches to evaluation are examinations of the history of architectural education and building form; typologies of school for architecture; and the systematic user evaluations of the aesthetics, function, and technology which reveal the strengths to encourage and weaknesses to avoid in future designs. While offering specific guidelines for schools of design, it also includes findings that extend beyond the walls of design schools and can be applied to everything from the interiors of educational and campus buildings to planning offices and gathering places to build communities. This book will make readers more aware of problems in architectural interiors and suggest ways to make interiors work better for the building occupants.

Why Architecture Matters

Author: Blair Kamin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226423227
Format: PDF
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For more than a decade, Pulitzer Prize-winning Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin has been writing fiery, intelligent essays on the state of contemporary architecture. His subjects range from high-rises to highways, parks to public housing, Frank Lloyd Wright to Frank Gehry. Why Architecture Matters collects the best of Kamin's acclaimed columns, offering both a look at America's foremost architectural city and a taste of Kamin's penetrating, witty style of critique.

Lessons from Vernacular Architecture

Author: Willi Weber
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135015546
Format: PDF
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The architectural community has had a strong and continuing interest in traditional and vernacular architecture. Lessons from Vernacular Architecture takes lessons directly from traditional and vernacular architecture and offers them to the reader as guidance and inspiration for new buildings. The appropriate technical and social solutions provided by vernacular and traditional architecture are analysed in detail. International case studies focus on environmental design aspects of traditional architecture in a broad range of climatic conditions and building types.

Managing Your Career

Author: Fifty Lessons
Publisher: Harvard Business Press
ISBN: 1422162168
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Wondering how the most accomplished leaders from around the globe have tackled their toughest challenges? Now you can find out—with Lessons Learned. Concise and engaging, each volume in this new series offers 12-14 insightful essays by top leaders in industry, the public sector, and academia on the most pressing issues they’ve faced. The contributors share surprisingly personal anecdotes and offer authoritative and practical advice drawn from their years of hard-earned experience. The series launches with three volumes, each of which centers on a timely topic: · Leading by Example · Managing Your Career · Managing Change A crucial resource for today’s busy executive, Lessons Learned gives you instant access to the wisdom and expertise of the world’s most talented leaders. 50 Lessons’ digital library holds more than 500 individual lessons from over 100 high-profile leaders from industry, the public sector, and academia from companies and institutions around the world.

Trust in Schools

Author: Anthony Bryk
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 161044096X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Most Americans agree on the necessity of education reform, but there is little consensus about how this goal might be achieved. The rhetoric of standards and vouchers has occupied center stage, polarizing public opinion and affording little room for reflection on the intangible conditions that make for good schools. Trust in Schools engages this debate with a compelling examination of the importance of social relationships in the successful implementation of school reform. Over the course of three years, Bryk and Schneider, together with a diverse team of other researchers and school practitioners, studied reform in twelve Chicago elementary schools. Each school was undergoing extensive reorganization in response to the Chicago School Reform Act of 1988, which called for greater involvement of parents and local community leaders in their neighborhood schools. Drawing on years longitudinal survey and achievement data, as well as in-depth interviews with principals, teachers, parents, and local community leaders, the authors develop a thorough account of how effective social relationships—which they term relational trust—can serve as a prime resource for school improvement. Using case studies of the network of relationships that make up the school community, Bryk and Schneider examine how the myriad social exchanges that make up daily life in a school community generate, or fail to generate, a successful educational environment. The personal dynamics among teachers, students, and their parents, for example, influence whether students regularly attend school and sustain their efforts in the difficult task of learning. In schools characterized by high relational trust, educators were more likely to experiment with new practices and work together with parents to advance improvements. As a result, these schools were also more likely to demonstrate marked gains in student learning. In contrast, schools with weak trust relations saw virtually no improvement in their reading or mathematics scores. Trust in Schools demonstrates convincingly that the quality of social relationships operating in and around schools is central to their functioning, and strongly predicts positive student outcomes. This book offer insights into how trust can be built and sustained in school communities, and identifies some features of public school systems that can impede such development. Bryk and Schneider show how a broad base of trust across a school community can provide a critical resource as education professional and parents embark on major school reforms. A Volume in the American Sociological Association's Rose Series in Sociology