Surveyors of Empire

Author: Stephen J. Hornsby
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773538151
Format: PDF, Docs
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Using research from both sides of the Atlantic, Stephen Hornsby examines the development of British military cartography in North America during and after the Seven Years War, as well as advancements in military and scientific equipment used in surveying. At the same time, he follows the land speculation of two leading surveyors, Samuel Holland and J.F.W. Des Barres, and the publication history of The Atlantic Neptune. Richly illustrated with images from The Atlantic Neptune and earlier maps, Surveyors of Empire is an insightful account of the relationship between science and imperialism, and the British shaping of the Atlantic world.

The Fault Lines of Empire

Author: Elizabeth Mancke
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415950015
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Elizabeth Mancke presents a comparative history arguing that differences in the political cultures of Canada and the United States have their origins in changes in the governance of the British Empire in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

The New Map of Empire

Author: S. Max Edelson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674972117
Format: PDF, Docs
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After the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War in 1763, British America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Florida Keys, from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, and across new islands in the West Indies. To better rule these vast dominions, Britain set out to map its new territories with unprecedented rigor and precision. Max Edelson's The New Map of Empire pictures the contested geography of the British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and consequences of Britain's imperial ambitions in the generation before the American Revolution. Under orders from King George III to reform the colonies, the Board of Trade dispatched surveyors to map far-flung frontiers, chart coastlines in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sound Florida's rivers, parcel tropical islands into plantation tracts, and mark boundaries with indigenous nations across the continental interior. Scaled to military standards of resolution, the maps they produced sought to capture the essential attributes of colonial spaces-their natural capacities for agriculture, navigation, and commerce-and give British officials the knowledge they needed to take command over colonization from across the Atlantic. Britain's vision of imperial control threatened to displace colonists as meaningful agents of empire and diminished what they viewed as their greatest historical accomplishment: settling the New World. As London's mapmakers published these images of order in breathtaking American atlases, Continental and British forces were already engaged in a violent contest over who would control the real spaces they represented. Accompanying Edelson's innovative spatial history of British America are online visualizations of more than 250 original maps, plans, and charts.

John Norden s The Surveyor s Dialogue 1618

Author: Mr Mark Netzloff
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409476073
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This edition provides the first complete, modern version of John Norden's The Surveyor's Dialogue. Norden's text, a series of dialogues between a fictional surveyor and several interlocutors—including a tenant farmer, an aristocrat landowner, a manorial officer, and a socially mobile land buyer—is remarkable for its unique commentary on the agrarian roots of English capitalism. In his extensive introduction, Mark Netzloff situates the text in relation to a number of early modern contexts. He discusses the use of dialogue and other literary forms in proto-scientific writing and the role of print in the increasing professionalism of early surveyors. Netzloff also examines the impact of capital formation on agrarian and manorial class relations, discussing topics such as popular protest and revolt, cottagers and the rural poor, regionalism and urbanization, and the transformation of the natural environment through deforestation, enclosure, and the appropriation of commons. Alongside a thorough annotation of technical and historical terms, the edition provides a list of textual variants among early modern versions of the text. This critical edition of The Surveyor's Dialogue constitutes an important contribution to early modern scholarship, and it will be invaluable to scholars from a range of fields, including the history of science, economic and agrarian history, and literary and cultural studies.

BIM and Quantity Surveying

Author: Steve Pittard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317387953
Format: PDF, Docs
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The sudden arrival of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a key part of the building industry is redefining the roles and working practices of its stakeholders. Many clients, designers, contractors, quantity surveyors, and building managers are still finding their feet in an industry where BIM compliance can bring great rewards. This guide is designed to help quantity surveying practitioners and students understand what BIM means for them, and how they should prepare to work successfully on BIM compliant projects. The case studies show how firms at the forefront of this technology have integrated core quantity surveying responsibilities like cost estimating, tendering, and development appraisal into high profile BIM projects. In addition to this, the implications for project management, facilities management, contract administration and dispute resolution are also explored through case studies, making this a highly valuable guide for those in a range of construction project management roles. Featuring a chapter describing how the role of the quantity surveyor is likely to permanently shift as a result of this development, as well as descriptions of tools used, this covers both the organisational and practical aspects of a crucial topic.

Mapping an Empire

Author: Matthew H. Edney
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226184862
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly

To Master the Boundless Sea

Author: Jason W. Smith
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469640457
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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As the United States grew into an empire in the late nineteenth century, notions like "sea power" derived not only from fleets, bases, and decisive battles but also from a scientific effort to understand and master the ocean environment. Beginning in the early nineteenth century and concluding in the first years of the twentieth, Jason W. Smith tells the story of the rise of the U.S. Navy and the emergence of American ocean empire through its struggle to control nature. In vividly told sketches of exploration, naval officers, war, and, most significantly, the ocean environment, Smith draws together insights from environmental, maritime, military, and naval history, and the history of science and cartography, placing the U.S. Navy's scientific efforts within a broader cultural context. By recasting and deepening our understanding of the U.S. Navy and the United States at sea, Smith brings to the fore the overlooked work of naval hydrographers, surveyors, and cartographers. In the nautical chart's soundings, names, symbols, and embedded narratives, Smith recounts the largely untold story of a young nation looking to extend its power over the boundless sea.

The Hungry Empire

Author: Lizzie Collingham
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 9780099586951
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The glamorous daughter of an African chief shares a pineapple with a slave trader... Surveyors in British Columbia eat tinned Australian rabbit... Diamond prospectors in Guyana prepare an iguana curry... In twenty meals The Hungry Empire tells the story of how the British created a global network of commerce and trade in foodstuffs that moved people and plants from one continent to another, re-shaping landscapes and culinary tastes. The Empire allowed Britain to harness the globe's edible resources from cod fish and salt beef to spices, tea and sugar. Lizzie Collingham takes us on a wide-ranging culinary journey, revealing how virtually every meal we eat still contains a taste of empire.