Shorelines

Author: Ajantha Subramanian
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804786852
Format: PDF, Kindle
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After a clerical sanction prohibited them from fishing for a week, a group of Catholic fishers from a village on India's southwestern coast took their church to court. They called on the state to recognize them as custodians of the local sea, protect their right to regulate trawling, and reject the church's intermediary role. In Shorelines, Ajantha Subramanian argues that their struggle requires a rethinking of Indian democracy, citizenship, and environmentalism. Rather than see these fishers as non-moderns inhabiting a bounded cultural world, or as moderns wholly captured by the logic of state power, she illustrates how they constitute themselves as political subjects. In particular, she shows how they produced new geographies—of regionalism, common property, alternative technology, and fisher citizenship—that underpinned claims to rights, thus using space as an instrument of justice. Moving beyond the romantic myth of self-contained, natural-resource dependent populations, this work reveals the charged political maneuvers that bound subalterns and sovereigns in South Asia. In rich historical and ethnographic detail, Shorelines illuminates postcolonial rights politics as the product of particular histories of caste, religion, and development, allowing us to see how democracy is always "provincial."

Pentecostals Proselytization and Anti Christian Violence in Contemporary India

Author: Chad M. Bauman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190202106
Format: PDF, Docs
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In contemporary violence against India's Christians, Pentecostals are disproportionately targeted. Based on extensive interviews and ethnographic work, this volume accounts for this disproportionate targeting through a detailed analysis of Indian Christian history, contemporary Indian politics, and Indian social and cultural characteristics.

Statemaking and Territory in South Asia

Author: Bernardo A. Michael
Publisher: Anthem Press
ISBN: 085728519X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Analyzes how European colonization transformed the organization of territory in South Asia, by examining the territorial disputes that underlay the Anglo-Gorkha War and subsequent efforts of the colonial state to reorder its territories. -- Publisher.

The Slow Boil

Author: Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804799393
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Street food vendors are both a symbol and a scourge of Mumbai: cheap roadside snacks are enjoyed by all, but the people who make them dance on a razor's edge of legality. While neighborhood associations want the vendors off cluttered sidewalks, many Mumbaikers appreciate the convenient bargains they offer. In The Slow Boil, Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria draws on his long-term fieldwork with these vendors to make sense of the paradoxes within the city and, thus, to create a better understanding of urban space in general. Much urban studies literature paints street vendors either as oppressed and marginalized victims or as inventive premoderns. In contrast, Anjaria acknowledges that diverse political, economic, historic, and symbolic processes create contradictions in the vendors' everday lives, like their illegality and proximity to the state, and their insecurity and permanence. Mumbai's disorderly sidewalks reflect the simmering tensions over livelihood, democracy, and rights that are central to the city but have long been overlooked. In The Slow Boil, these issues are not subsumed into a larger framework, but are explored on their own terms.

The Politics of Heritage from Madras to Chennai

Author: Mary E. Hancock
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253002656
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In this anthropological history, Mary E. Hancock examines the politics of public memory in the southern Indian city of Chennai. Once a colonial port, Chennai is now poised to become a center for India's "new economy" of information technology, export processing, and back-office services. State and local governments promote tourism and a heritage-conscious cityscape to make Chennai a recognizable "brand" among investment and travel destinations. Using a range of textual, visual, architectural, and ethnographic sources, Hancock grapples with the question of how people in Chennai remember and represent their past, considering the political and economic contexts and implications of those memory practices. Working from specific sites, including a historic district created around an ancient Hindu temple, a living history museum, neo-traditional and vernacular architecture, and political memorials, Hancock examines the spatialization of memory under the conditions of neoliberalism.

Mappila Muslim Culture

Author: Roland E. Miller
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438456018
Format: PDF, Docs
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Thorough exploration of the distinct culture of the Mappila Muslims of Kerala, India. This book provides a comprehensive account of the distinct culture of the Mappila Muslims, a large community from the southern Indian state of Kerala. Although they were the first Muslim community in South Asia, the Mappilas are little-known in the West. Roland E. Miller explores the Mappilas’ fourteen-century-long history of social adaptation and their current status as a successful example of Muslim interaction with modernity. Once feared, now admired, Kerala’s Mappilas have produced an intellectual renaissance and renewed their ancient status as a model of social harmony. Miller provides an account of Mappila history and looks at the formation of Mappila culture, which has developed through the interaction of Islamic and Malayali influences. Descriptions of current day life cycles, religion, ritual, work life, education, and leadership are included.

The Spirit of the Laws in Mozambique

Author: Juan Obarrio
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022615386X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Mozambique has been hailed as a success story by political analysts as well as by the international community of donors, who have supported the juridical reform of the state which has been ongoing since the end of the civil war and transition from Socialism in the mid 1990s. The present book by anthropologist Juan Obarrio reveals a very different picture. The work is an ethnographic study of transformations of the state in Mozambique over a span of thirty-five years: from Portuguese colonialism, through Afro-Marxism, civil war, and the current neoliberal democratic transition. It examines the ongoing construction of a complex juridical and political field of forces in which several competing authorities claim sovereignty over the local. Obarrio s main argument is that despite the wave of democratization and liberalization that has occurred over the last two decades, the current Mozambican state enforces a type of restricted citizenship, linked to the re-appraisal of pre-colonial customary formations. Ultimately, Obarrio views the African postcolony as a maze of competing jurisdictions through which historical difference is reproduced, showing the limits of state sovereignty as well as democratic citizenship. The legacies of violence from the colonial regime, the Socialist experience and the devastating the civil war still inhabit the force of law today, underscoring the necessity of an anthropology of law and justice for enriching the approaches of Africanist postcolonial theory. In Obarrio s account, custom re-emerges, not as a figure of the past but, rather, as the ambiguous future of postcolonial political history."

Navigating Austerity

Author: Laura Bear
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804795541
Format: PDF
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Navigating Austerity addresses a key policy question of our era: what happens to society and the environment when austerity dominates political and economic life? To get to the heart of this issue, Laura Bear tells the stories of boatmen, shipyard workers, hydrographers, port bureaucrats and river pilots on the Hooghly River, a tributary of the Ganges that flows into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. Through their accounts, Bear traces the hidden currents of state debt crises and their often devastating effects. Taking the reader on a voyage along the river, Bear reveals how bureaucrats, entrepreneurs and workers navigate austerity policies. Their attempts to reverse the decline of ruined public infrastructures, environments and urban spaces lead Bear to argue for a radical rethinking of economics according to a social calculus. This is a critical measure derived from the ethical concerns of people affected by national policies. It places issues of redistribution and inequality at the fore of public and environmental plans. Concluding with proposals for restoring more just long term social obligations, Bear suggests new practices of state financing and ways to democratize fiscal policy. Her aim is to transform sovereign debt from a financial problem into a widely debated ethical and political issue. Navigating Austerity contributes to policy studies as well as to the understanding of today's global injustices. It also develops new theories about the significance of state debt, speculation and time for contemporary capitalism. Sited on a single body of water flowing with rhythms of circulation, renewal and transformation, this ambitious and accessible book will be of interest to specialists and general readers.

Cambridge IGCSE Geography Revision Guide Student s Book

Author: David Davies
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107674824
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Cambridge IGCSE Geography Revision Guide has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of Cambridge IGCSE Geography syllabus (0460). It has been written to help students prepare for the Cambridge IGCSE Geography examination. The book instills confidence by improving the students' understanding of key concepts and adds focus to their revision.

Free the Beaches

Author: Andrew W. Kahrl
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300215142
Format: PDF, ePub
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The story of our separate and unequal America in the making, and one man's fight against it During the long, hot summers of the late 1960s and 1970s, one man began a campaign to open some of America's most exclusive beaches to minorities and the urban poor. That man was anti-poverty activist and one‑time presidential candidate Ned Coll of Connecticut, a state that permitted public access to a mere seven miles of its 253‑mile shoreline. Nearly all of the state's coast was held privately, for the most part by white, wealthy residents. This book is the first to tell the story of the controversial protester who gathered a band of determined African American mothers and children and challenged the racist, exclusionary tactics of homeowners in a state synonymous with liberalism. Coll's legacy of remarkable successes--and failures--illuminates how our nation's fragile coasts have not only become more exclusive in subsequent decades but also have suffered greater environmental destruction and erosion as a result of that private ownership.