Real Country

Author: Aaron A. Fox
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822333487
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and the role of music within it. Showing that country music is deeply embedded in working-class culture, Fox argues that it is the cultural and intellectual property of working-class people, not of the Nashville-based music industry or the stars whose lives figure so prominently in popular and scholarly writing about the genre. Having spent hundreds of hours observing and participating in talk and music-making in beer joints, garage jam sessions, and trailer homes, Fox renders in vivid detail everyday life in Lockhart, and particularly in the honky-tonk--the ice cold beer, battered guitars by the bar, and local musical legends including Randy Meyer and Larry "Hoppy" Hopkins. Throughout, Fox focuses on the human voice. His detailed analyses of conversations, interviews, songs, and vocal techniques show how feeling and experience are expressed, how local understandings of place, memory, musical aesthetics, working-class social history, race, and gender are shared. In Real Country, between exhausting shifts at the plant or nursing home or construction site, people talk and sing, reaching beyond the world as it is to an idealized past, to a time before NAFTA and the threatening sprawl of metropolitan Austin, to a time before country music went the way of televised specials and fm radio stations.

Real Country

Author: Aaron A. Fox
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822385996
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and its music. Showing that country music is deeply embedded in the textures of working-class life, Fox argues that it is the cultural and intellectual property of working-class people and not only of the Nashville-based music industry or the stars whose lives figure so prominently in popular and scholarly writing about the genre. Fox spent hundreds of hours observing, recording, and participating in talk and music-making in homes, beer joints, and garage jam sessions. He renders the everyday life of Lockhart’s working-class community in detail, right down to the ice cold beer, the battered guitars, and the technical skills of such local musical legends as Randy Meyer and Larry “Hoppy” Hopkins. Throughout, Fox focuses on the human voice. His analyses of conversations, interviews, songs, and vocal techniques show how feeling and experience are expressed, and how local understandings of place, memory, musical aesthetics, working-class social history, race, and gender are shared. In Real Country, working-class Texans re-imagine their past and give voice to the struggles and satisfactions of their lives in the present through music.

Real country

Author: Aaron A. Fox
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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An ethnographic study of country music, and the bars, life, and everyday speech of its rural fans.

Sound and Sentiment

Author: Steven Feld
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822353652
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A new, thirtieth-anniversary edition of the landmark ethnography that introduced the anthropology, or the cultural study, of sound.

The Cowboy in Country Music

Author: Don Cusic
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786486058
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"This series of biographical profiles shines a spotlight on that special place "Where the West meets the Guitar." Once called "Country and Western," it is now described as "Country or Western." Featured are a number of photos of the top stars, past and present. Also included is an extensive bibliography of works related to the Western music field"--Provided by publisher.

Fado Resounding

Author: Lila Ellen Gray
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082237885X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Fado, Portugal's most celebrated genre of popular music, can be heard in Lisbon clubs, concert halls, tourist sites, and neighborhood bars. Fado sounds traverse the globe, on internationally marketed recordings, as the "soul" of Lisbon. A fadista might sing until her throat hurts, the voice hovering on the break of a sob; in moments of sung beauty listeners sometimes cry. Providing an ethnographic account of Lisbon's fado scene, Lila Ellen Gray draws on research conducted with amateur fado musicians, fadistas, communities of listeners, poets, fans, and cultural brokers during the first decade of the twenty-first century. She demonstrates the power of music to transform history and place into feeling in a rapidly modernizing nation on Europe's periphery, a country no longer a dictatorship or an imperial power. Gray emphasizes the power of the genre to absorb sounds, memories, histories, and styles and transform them into new narratives of meaning and "soul."

Race Rebels

Author: Robin Kelley
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439105049
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Many black strategies of daily resistance have been obscured--until now. Race rebels, argues Kelley, have created strategies of resistance, movements, and entire subcultures. Here, for the first time, everyday race rebels are given the historiographical attention they deserve, from the Jim Crow era to the present.

Hidden in the Mix

Author: Diane Pecknold
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822351633
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A collection of essays considering how country music became "white," how that fictive racialization has been maintained, and how African American artists and fans have used country music to elaborate their own identities.

Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks

Author: Travis D. Stimeling
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199830622
Format: PDF, Docs
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Country music of the late 1960s and early 1970s was a powerful symbol of staunch conservative resistance to the emerging counterculture. But starting around 1972, the city of Austin, Texas became host to a growing community of musicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, and fans who saw country music as a part of their collective heritage and sought to merge it with countercultural ideals to forge a distinctly Texan counterculture. Progressive country music-a hybrid of country music and rock-blossomed in this growing Austin community, as it played out the contradictions at work among its residents. The music was at once firmly grounded in the traditional Texan culture in which they had been raised, and profoundly affected by their newly radicalized, convention-flouting ways. In Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks: The Countercultural Sounds of Austin's Progressive Country Music Scene, Travis Stimeling connects the local Austin culture and the progressive music that became its trademark. He presents a colorful range of evidence, from behavior and dress, to newspaper articles, to personal interviews of musicians. Along the way, Stimeling uncovers parodies of the cosmic cowboy image that reinforce the longing for a more peaceful way of life, but that also recognize an awareness of the muddled, conflicted nature of this counterculture identity. Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks provides new insight into the inner workings of Austin's progressive country music scene-by bringing the music and musicians brilliantly to life.

Heritage Labour and the Working Classes

Author: Laurajane Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136698531
Format: PDF, ePub
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Heritage, Labour and the Working Classes is both a celebration and commemoration of working class culture. It contains sometimes inspiring accounts of working class communities and people telling their own stories, and weaves together examples of tangible and intangible heritage, place, history, memory, music and literature. Rather than being framed in a 'social inclusion' framework, which sees working class culture as a deficit, this book addresses the question "What is labour and working class heritage, how does it differ or stand in opposition to dominant ways of understanding heritage and history, and in what ways is it used as a contemporary resource?" It also explores how heritage is used in working class communities and by labour organizations, and considers what meanings and significance this heritage may have, while also identifying how and why communities and their heritage have been excluded. Drawing on new scholarship in heritage studies, social memory, the public history of labour, and new working class studies, this volume highlights the heritage of working people, communities and organizations. Contributions are drawn from a number of Western countries including the USA, UK, Spain, Sweden, Australia and New Zealand, and from a range of disciplines including heritage and museum studies, history, sociology, politics, archaeology and anthropology. Heritage, Labour and the Working Classes represents an innovative and useful resource for heritage and museum practitioners, students and academics concerned with understanding community heritage and the debate on social inclusion/exclusion. It offers new ways of understanding heritage, its values and consequences, and presents a challenge to dominant and traditional frameworks for understanding and identifying heritage and heritage making.