John Fante Selected Letters 1932 1981

Author: John Fante
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062013092
Format: PDF
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Fante's captivating letters trace his emergence from poverty to life as a Hollywood screenwriter. Complemented by many photos and interesting appendices, the book is most distinguished by Fante's letters to his mother-letters in which he is just as apt to lie about church attendance as he is to describe, with peculiar candor, skinny-dipping with a girl friend.

John Fante

Author: Stephen Cooper
Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 9780838637784
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This collection of critical essays on the fiction of John Fante is the first concerted effort to assess the work, and acknowledge the significance, of one of America's most engaging and original twentieth-century literary talents. Over the span of a half-century - from the early 1930s to the early 1980s - the Italian-American Fante (1909-1983) wrote short stories and novels that drew on his own life from his Catholic childhood in Colorado through his down-and-out days in Los Angeles, to his adventures as a screenwriter in Hollywood. He writes about all these things with gusto, humor, directness, and an honesty tinged with the irony of a true modernist.

John Fante

Author: Richard Collins
Publisher: Guernica Editions
ISBN: 9781550710717
Format: PDF, ePub
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John Fante, an important figure in the history of the Italian-American novel, is proving to be fascinating to contemporary readers. Richard Collins has caught Fante's spirit from several crucial angles: as an ethnic writer; as a comic novelist; as a serious writer struggling to remain so in Hollywood. Intelligent, balanced, informative, and empathetic, this book combines criticism with scholarship, and biography with history to make what Henry James would have called a perfect 'literary portrait, ' for it gives life to an interesting subject

Queen Calafia s Paradise

Author: Kenneth Scambray
Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 0838641172
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In Queen Calafia's Paradise, Ken Scambray explains that California offers Italian American protagonists a unique cultural landscape in which to define what it means to be an American and how Italian American protagonists embark on a voyage to reconcile their Old World heritage with modern American society. In Pasinetti's From the Academy Bridge (1970), Scambray analyzes the influence of Pasinetti's diverse California landscape upon his protagonist. Scambray argues that any reading of Madalena's Confetti for Gino (1959), set in San Diego's Little Italy, must take into account Madalena's homosexuality and his little known homosexual World War II novel, The Invisible Glass (1950). In his chapters covering John Fante's Los Angeles fiction, Scambray explores the Italian American's quest to locate a home in Southern California. Ken Scambray teaches courses in North American Italian literature and Los Angeles fiction at the University of La Verne.

Imagining Los Angeles

Author: David M. Fine
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874176032
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The literary image of Los Angeles has evolved since the 1880s from promotional literature that hyped the region as a New Eden to contemporary visions of the city as a perplexing, sometimes corrupt, even apocalyptic place that reflects all that is wrong with America. In"Imagining Los Angeles," the first literary history of the city in more than fifty years, critic David Fine traces the history and mood of the place through the work of writers as diverse as Helen Hunt Jackson, Mary Austin, Norman Mailer, Raymond Chandler, Joan Didion, Carolyn See, and many others. His lively and engaging text focuses on the way these writers saw Los Angeles and used the image of the city as an element in their work, and on how that image has changed as the city itself became ever larger, more complex, and more socially and ethnically diverse. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the literature and changing image of Southern California."

Ethnic Modernism

Author: Werner Sollors
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674030916
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the first half of the twentieth century, the United States moved from the periphery to the center of global cultural production. How did African American, European immigrant, and other minority writers take part in these developments that also transformed the United States, giving it an increasingly multicultural self-awareness? This book attempts to address this question in a series of innovative and engaging close readings of major texts from this period.

40 Days of Dating

Author: Jessica Walsh
Publisher: Abrams
ISBN: 1613127154
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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When New York–based graphic designers and long-time friends Timothy Goodman and Jessica Walsh found themselves single at the same time, they decided to try an experiment. The old adage says that it takes 40 days to change a habit—could the same be said for love? So they agreed to date each other for 40 days, record their experiences in questionnaires, photographs, videos, texts, and artworks, and post the material on a website they would create for this purpose. What began as a small experiment between two friends became an Internet sensation, drawing 5 million unique (and obsessed) visitors from around the globe to their site and their story since it was launched in July 2013. 40 Days of Dating: An Experiment is a beautifully designed, expanded look at the experiment and the results, including a great deal of material that never made it onto the site, such as who they were as friends and individuals before the 40 days and who they have become since. Note: 40 Days of Dating has a special binding that allows it to open very flat by attaching the endpapers to the inside covers.