Jews in Nevada

Author: John P. Marschall
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874177374
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The book is the first comprehensive documented study of Jews in Nevada from 1850 to the present. It details their involvement in the development and fostering of the state’s earliest settlements and its social and political institutions. Among the themes are: antisemitism, Jewish participation in civil rights initiatives, and the explosive growth of Jewry in the Las Vegas metropolitan area along with the development of an expanding Jewish cultural infrastructure. It includes victimized peddlers and modern millionaires, heroines and exploiters, underworld figures and philanthropists, as well as the religiously observant and secular.

Spring 2011

Author: Logaranee Gunaratnam
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Peoples of Las Vegas

Author: Jerry L. Simich
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874176162
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Las Vegas is known the world over as an oasis of entertainment in the Nevada desert, but to more than a million people of exceptionally varied origins, it is also home. Yet this city is rarely mentioned in studies of ethnicity or immigration, and the rich diversity of its population is largely invisible to Las Vegans and visitors alike. Such ignorance can be partly explained by the effects of the city's rapid growth. Las Vegas largely lacks traditional ethnic neighborhoods, and the restaurants and markets that cater to its diverse population groups are mostly hidden away in anonymous strip malls. Nonetheless, a remarkable variety of nationalities and ethnic groups has been drawn here since the city's beginnings in 1905, and today Las Vegas's vital service industry, entrepreneurial opportunities, reasonable cost of living, and appeal as a retirement center attract many more. Recent world events and international currents of immigration have only enhanced this diversity. In The Peoples of Las Vegas, seventeen scholars profile thirteen of the ethnic groups that make up their city's population. kaleidoscope of ethnicity that helps define Las Vegas today and analyzes the economic and social conditions that make Las Vegas so attractive to recent immigrants. The individual contributors--most of whom are members of the groups they write about, and who come from a broad array of disciplines--discuss the motivations and processes of their group's migration to Las Vegas, economic pursuits, institutions and other means of preserving and transmitting their culture, involvement with the broader community, ties with their homelands, and recent demographic trends affecting each group. This collection of essays provides a provocative look into the vibrant ethnic life that lies just beneath the glittering surface of one of America's most unusual cities.

Beyond the Mafia

Author: Alan Richard Balboni
Publisher: University of Nevada Press
ISBN: 9780874176810
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When Beyond the Mafia first appeared in 1996, it was hailed as a significant contribution to the history of Las Vegas and of ethnic minorities in America. Author, Alan Balboni traces the history of Italians in Las Vegas from the founding of the city in 1905, recording their activities in the fledgling settlement. As Las Vegas grew, Italian Americans participated in every aspect of the city's society and economy, including construction, retail establishments, hotels, and - after the statewide legalization of gambling in 1931 - the casino industry. Basing his research on well over a hundred interviews, as well as the records of Italian American organizations, public agencies, and other sources, Balboni has produced a sparkling, farsighted, and thoroughly documented account of the history of one of Las Vegas' most progressive and productive ethnic minorities. This new paperback edition includes an afterword by the author that brings the story of Las Vegas' Italian Americans up to the present.

History of Nevada

Author: Russell R. Elliott
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803267152
Format: PDF
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Maintaining the same high standards of the first edition, published in 1973, this new, revised edition is still the most comprehensive one-volume history of a state that was once thought of as "a bridge to somewhere else." In revising, Elliott summarizes the state's economic, political, and social history since 1973 and strengthens a major point he made then: that Nevada's acceptance of liberal marriage and divorce laws and of legalized gambling brought economic stability to a state singularly devoid of stable economic resources. -- from Book Jacket

Jewish Women Pioneering the Frontier Trail

Author: Jeanne E. Abrams
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081470719X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"In many ways, the Jewish experience in the West was distinct. Given the still-forming social landscape, beginning with the 1848 Gold Rush, Jews were able to integrate more fully into local communities than they had in the East. Jewish women in the West took advantage of the unsettled nature of the region to "open new doors" for themselves in the public sphere in ways often not yet possible elsewhere in the country. Women were crucial to the survival of early communities, and made distinct contributions not only in shaping Jewish communal life but outside the Jewish community as well. Western Jewish women's level of involvement at the vanguard of social welfare and progressive reform, commerce, politics, and higher education and the professions is striking given their relatively small numbers."--BOOK JACKET.

Experiments in Democracy

Author: Cheryl Black
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809334690
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the first half of the twentieth century, a number of American theatres and theatre artists fostered interracial collaboration and socialization on stage, behind the scenes, and among audiences. In an era marked by entrenched racial segregation and inequality, these artists used performance to bridge America’s persistent racial divide and to bring African American, Latino/Latina, Asian American, Native American, and Jewish American communities and traditions into the nation’s broader cultural conversation. In Experiments in Democracy, edited by Cheryl Black and Jonathan Shandell, theatre historians examine a wide range of performances—from Broadway, folk plays and dance productions to scripted political rallies and radio dramas. Contributors look at such diverse groups as the Theatre Union, La Unión Martí-Maceo, and the American Negro Theatre, as well as individual playwrights and their works, including Theodore Browne’s folk opera Natural Man, Josefina Niggli’s Soldadera, and playwright Lynn Riggs’s Cherokee Night and Green Grow the Lilacs (the basis for the musical Oklahoma!). Exploring the ways progressive artists sought to connect isolated racial and cultural groups in pursuit of a more just and democratic society, contributors take into account the blind spots, compromised methods, and unacknowledged biases at play in their practices and strategies. Essays demonstrate how the gap between the ideal of American democracy and its practice—mired in entrenched systems of white privilege, economic inequality, and social prejudice—complicated the work of these artists. Focusing on questions of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality on the stage in the decades preceding the Civil Rights era, Experiments in Democracy fills an important gap in our understanding of the history of the American stage—and sheds light on these still-relevant questions in contemporary American society.