Epidemiology and Culture

Author: James A. Trostle
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521793896
Format: PDF, Docs
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Demonstrating how practitioners in the emerging field of "cultural epidemiology" describe human health, communicate with diverse audiences, and intervene to improve health and prevent disease, this book uses textual and statistical portraits of disease to describe interdisciplinary collaborations. Interpreting epidemiology as a cultural practice helps to reveal the ways in which measurement, causal thinking, and intervention design are influenced by belief, habit, and theories of power.

Culture Health and Illness Fifth edition

Author: Cecil G. Helman
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1444113631
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Culture, Health and Illness is the leading international textbook on the role of cultural and social factors in health, illness, and medical care. Since first published in 1984, it has been used in over 40 countries within universities, medical schools and nursing colleges. This new edition meets the ever-growing need for a clear starting point in understanding the clinical significance of cultural and social factors. The book addresses the complex interactions between health, illness and culture by setting out anthropological theory in a highly readable, jargon-free style and integrating this with the practice of health care using real-life examples and case histories. Fully revised throughout, the fifth edition has expanded its coverage of topics that are challenging both the patient and the carer's understanding of health and illness: poverty and inequality of healthcare, genetics, biotechnology, the internet and health, chronic diseases, drug-resistant infections, changes in nutrition and body image, medical care of migrants, medical technology, global pandemics such as AIDS and malaria, drug and alcohol dependence, and patients' 'languages of distress', a complex topic central to the doctor-patient relationship. In today's world of increasing cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of populations, Culture, Health and Illness is essential reading for students of medicine, nursing, psychiatry, public health, health education, international health and medical anthropology, across the globe.

Anthropology and Public Health

Author: Robert A. Hahn
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195374649
Format: PDF, ePub
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Through 24 case studies from around the world, the volume provides a powerful argument for the imperative of anthropological perspectives, methods, information, and collaboration in the understanding and practice of public health.

Epidemiology and Demography in Public Health

Author: Japhet Killewo
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9780123822017
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Epidemiology and Demography in Public Health provides practical guidance on planning and implementing surveillance and investigation of disease and disease outbreaks. Exploring contributing factors to the dynamics of disease transmission and the identification of population risks, it also includes a discussion of ehtics in epidemiology and demography including important issues of privacy vs. public safety. With a chapter on H1N1 and Bird flu, this book will be important for students and professionals in public health and epidemiology. Focuses on the techniques of surveillance and investigation of disease Includes biostatistics and analysis techniques Explores the ethics of disease studies Includes chapter discussing H1N1 and Bird Flu

The Cult And Science Of Public Health

Author: Kevin Dew
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781782385196
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In contemporary manifestations of public health rituals and events, people are being increasingly united around what they hold in common—their material being and humanity. As a cult of humanity, public health provides a moral force in society that replaces ‘traditional’ religions in times of great diversity or heterogeneity of peoples, activities and desires. This is in contrast to public health’s foundation in science, particularly the science of epidemiology. The rigid rules of ‘scientific evidence’ used to determine the cause of illness and disease can work against the most vulnerable in society by putting sectors of the population, such as underrepresented workers, at a disadvantage. This study focuses on this tension between traditional science and the changing vision articulated within public health (and across many disciplines) that calls for a collective response to uncontrolled capitalism and unremitting globalization, and to the way in which health inequalities and their association with social inequalities provides a political rhetoric that calls for a new redistributive social programme. Drawing on decades of research, the author argues that public health is both a cult and a science of contemporary society.

Encyclopedia of Epidemiology

Author: Sarah Boslaugh
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412928168
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Encyclopedia of Epidemiology presents state-of-the-art information from the field of epidemiology in a less technical and accessible style and format. With more than 600 entries, no single reference provides as comprehensive a resource in as focused and appropriate manner. The entries cover every major facet of epidemiology, from risk ratios to case-control studies to mediating and moderating variables, and much more. Relevant topics from related fields such as biostatistics and health economics are also included.

Public Health in the Arab World

Author: Samer Jabbour
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521516749
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume reviews the public health concerns and challenges specific to the complex Arab world from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Anthropology and Epidemiology

Author: C. Janes
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400937237
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Over the past two decades increasing interest has emerged in the contribu tions that the social sciences might make to the epidemiological study of patterns of health and disease. Several reasons can be cited for this increasing interest. Primary among these has been the rise of the chronic, non-infectious diseases as important causes of morbidity and mortality within Western populations during the 20th century. Generally speaking, the chronic, non infectious diseases are strongly influenced by lifestyle variables, which are themselves strongly influenced by social and cultural forces. The under standing of the effects of the behavioral factors in, say, hypertension, thus requires an understanding of the social and cultural factors which encourage obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, non-compliance with anti-hypertensive medica tions (or other prescribed regimens), and stress. Equally, there is a growing awareness that considerations of human behavior and its social and cultural determinants are important for understanding the distribution and control of infectious diseases. Related to this expansion of epidemiologic interest into the behavioral realm 'has been the development of etiological models which focus on the psychological, biological and socio-cultural characteristics of hosts, rather than exclusive concern with exposure to a particular agent or even behavioral risk. Also during this period advances in statistical and computing techniques have made accessible the ready testing of multivariate causal models, and so have encouraged the measurement of the effects of social and cultural factors on disease occurrence.

Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Ethnomedicine

Author: Mark Nichter
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9782881245299
Format: PDF, ePub
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Discussing career decision making (CDM), career guidance, a computerized system of career guidance, and the interplay among them, this book describes the way people sort themselves, or are sorted, into educational and occupational options. The options represent the content of this book, and the sorting represents the process. The sequence of decisions may extend over a lifetime, but several crucial choice-points tend to occur at predictable stages in a career. Career guidance is a professional intervention in CDM; "professional" implies that practitioners conform to a standard of ethics, knowledge, and competence beyond what may be offered by other intervenors. Guidance is partly an art, but it is also partly a science -- at least an application of science, based on a synthesis of logic and evidence derived from research. The computerized "System of Interactive Guidance and Information" (SIGI) is a designated guidance "treatment," clearly defined and specified. It was developed according to an explicit model, derived from a particular rationale for guidance, using modern technology to amplify the practice of career guidance. The current version -- called SIGI PLUS TM -- is being used at more than a thousand colleges and universities, as well as secondary schools, libraries, corporations, community-based organizations, and counseling agencies. These three interdependent topics are treated in a progression: from a theory of CDM to a rationale and a model for guidance to the design and development of a system. This book weaves together theory (principles, propositions, rationales, and models), research and development. The product of that development, SIGI, helps to define theory, to exemplify it, and to test it.