Edward IV Elizabeth Woodville

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445636948
Format: PDF, Kindle
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When Edward of York seized the English throne in 1461, he could have chosen any bride he wanted, but it was the beautiful widow, Elizabeth Wydeville, who captured his heart. A new assessment of the tumultuous life of the real White Queen and her husband

Elizabeth Woodville

Author: David Baldwin
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752468979
Format: PDF
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This is the first new account of Elizabeth's life for over fifty years and David Baldwin sets out to reveal the true story of this complex and intriguing woman. Hers was certainly a dramatic life with dizzying reversals of fortune; from poverty in 1461 to queenship in 1464, followed by deposition, restoration, and conflicts with Richard III and Henry VII before spending her final years in religious seclusion. There is also the issue of her two sons, the infamous 'Princes in the Tower', and the controversy surrounding their disappearance.

Elizabeth of York

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445618109
Format: PDF, Docs
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The biography of Henry VII's queen, and mother of Henry VIII, the true story of the 'White Princess'

Anne Neville

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445611775
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The real story of the 'Kingmaker's Daughter'. Published to coincide with the reburial of Richard III

The Six Wives and Many Mistresses of Henry VIII

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445633795
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For a King renowned for his love life, Henry VIII has traditionally been depicted as something of a prude, but the story may have been different for the women who shared his bed. How did they take the leap from courtier to lover, to wife? What was Henry really like as a lover? Henry's women were uniquely placed to experience the tension between his chivalric ideals and the lusts of the handsome, tall, athletic king; his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, was on one level a fairy-tale romance, but his affairs with Anne Stafford, Elizabeth Carew and Jane Popincourt undermined it early on. Later, his more established mistresses, Bessie Blount and Mary Boleyn, risked their good names by bearing him illegitimate children. Typical of his time, Henry did not see that casual liaisons might threaten his marriage, until he met the one woman who held him at arm's length. The arrival of Anne Boleyn changed everything. Her seductive eyes helped rewrite history. After their passionate marriage turned sour, the king rapidly remarried to Jane Seymour. Henry was a man of great appetites, ready to move heaven and earth for a woman he desired; Licence readdresses the experiences of his wives and mistresses in this frank, modern take on the affairs of his heart. What was it really like to be Mrs Henry VIII?

Edward IV Elizabeth Woodville

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445636948
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
When Edward of York seized the English throne in 1461, he could have chosen any bride he wanted, but it was the beautiful widow, Elizabeth Wydeville, who captured his heart. A new assessment of the tumultuous life of the real White Queen and her husband

Elizabeth I and Her Circle

Author: Susan Doran
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199574952
Format: PDF, Docs
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This is the story of Elizabeth I's inner circle and the crucial human relationships which lay at the heart of her personal and political life. Using a wide range of original sources - including private letters, portraits, verse, drama, and state papers - Susan Doran provides a vivid and often dramatic account of political life in Elizabethan England and the queen at its center, offering a deeper insight into Elizabeth's emotional and political conduct - and challenging many of the popular myths that have grown up around her. It is a story replete with fascinating questions. What was the true nature of Elizabeth's relationship with her father, Henry VIII, especially after his execution of her mother? How close was she to her half-brother Edward VI - and were relations with her half-sister Mary really as poisonous as is popularly assumed? And what of her relationship with her Stewart cousins, most famously with Mary Queen of Scots, executed on Elizabeth's orders in 1587, but also with Mary's son James VI of Scotland, later to succeed Elizabeth as her chosen successor? Elizabeth's relations with her family were crucial, but just as crucial were her relations with her courtiers and her councillors. Here again, the story raises a host of fascinating questions. Was the queen really sexually jealous of her maids of honour? Did physically attractive male favourites dominate her court? What does her long and intimate relationship with the Earl of Leicester reveal about her character, personality, and attitude to marriage? What can the fall of Essex tell us about Elizabeth's political management in the final years of her reign? And what was the true nature of her personal and political relationship with influential and long-serving councillors such as the Cecils and Sir Francis Walsingham? And how did courtiers and councillors deal with their demanding royal mistress?

Cecily Neville

Author: Amy Licence
Publisher: Amberley Pub Plc
ISBN: 9781445621234
Format: PDF, Docs
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Known to be proud, regal and beautiful, Cecily Neville was born in the year of the great English victory at Agincourt and survived long enough to witness the arrival of the future Henry VIII, her great-grandson. Her life spanned most of the fifteenth century. Cecily's marriage to Richard, Duke of York, was successful, even happy, and she travelled with him wherever his career dictated, bearing his children in England, Ireland and France, including the future Edward IV and Richard III. What was the substance behind her claim to be 'queen by right'? Would she indeed have made a good queen during these turbulent times? One of a huge family herself, Cecily would see two of her sons become kings of England but the struggles that tore apart the Houses of Lancaster and York also turned brother against brother. Cecily's life cannot have been easy. Images of her dripping in jewels and holding her own alternative 'court' might belie the terrible heartache of seeing her descendants destroy each other. In attempting to be the family peacemaker, she frequently had to make heart-wrenching choices, yet these did not destroy her. She battled on, outliving her husband, friends, rivals and most of her children, to become one of the era's great survivors.

The Women of the Wars of the Roses

Author: Alicia Carter
Publisher: BookBaby
ISBN: 1483509184
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Tudor dynasty traditionally starts with Henry VII’s victory at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. In reality, however, the story of England’s most popular dynasty starts much earlier—and it starts with three courageous women who shaped their own destiny. The Tudor dynasty traces its origin to Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Elizabeth of York—women who waged through blood and loss in order to finally emerge as the ultimate female survivors of the Wars of the Roses. Their posthumous images, however, couldn't be more different, and their lives are still shrouded in mystery. Elizabeth Woodville, the first commoner to marry a King of England, is chiefly remembered as a greedy queen who elevated her huge family, causing a stir in the realm. Margaret Beaufort, mother of the victorious Henry Tudor, is immortalised in history as an overly ambitious, scheming woman who ran her son’s court, pushing his wife aside. Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of Elizabeth Woodville and Edward IV, is perceived as a queen subjected to her mother-in-law and trapped in a loveless marriage to a man who ousted the last Yorkist King. It is time to dispel some of the most enduring myths about these extraordinary women who ultimately shaped the early Tudor dynasty. - Why were Elizabeth Woodville and her mother accused of witchcraft? - Was Margaret Beaufort a “mother-in-law from hell”? - Did Elizabeth of York have an incestuous relationship with her uncle, Richard III? These are only a few of the controversial questions discussed in this book. Within these pages, you will learn much more about the three women who emerged victorious from the Wars of the Roses, who tried to rebuild their lives while adjusting to the new, post-war Tudor era, and who founded a dynasty that would reign for more than a century.

Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses

Author: David Santiuste
Publisher: Pen & Sword
ISBN: 9781848845497
Format: PDF, Docs
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Indisputably the most effective general of the Wars of the Roses, Edward IV died in his bed, undefeated in battle. Yet Edward has not achieved the martial reputation of other warrior kings such as Henry V - perhaps because he fought battles against his own people in a civil war. It has also been suggested that he lacked the personal discipline expected of a truly great commander. But, as David Santiuste shows in this perceptive and highly readable new study, Edward was a formidable military leader whose strengths and subtlety have not been fully recognized. This reassessment of Edward's military role, and of the Wars of the Roses in which he played such a vital part, gives a fascinating insight into Edward the man and into the politics and the fighting. Based on contemporary sources and the latest scholarly research, Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses brings to life an extraordinary period of English history.