African Americans in Defense of the Nation

Author: James T. Controvich
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 0810874806
Format: PDF, Kindle
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While the role of the African American in American history has been written about extensively, it is often difficult to locate the wealth of material that has been published. African-Americans in Defense of the Nation builds on a long list of early bibliographies concerning the subject, bringing together a broad spectrum of titles related to the African-American participation in America's wars. It covers both military exploits—as African Americans have been involved in every American conflict since the Revolution—and their participation in the homefront support.

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939

Author: Robert L. Harris, Jr.
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231138116
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, Robert L. Harris Jr. and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods. They consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in American society and discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g., "Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American." An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 is a multifaceted map of a crucial historical period.

Women in the United States Military

Author: Judith Bellafaire
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136854061
Format: PDF
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Women’s participation in the U.S. Armed Forces has grown over time in response to the national need for their services. Throughout each era of American history, patriotic women volunteered to serve their country in a wide variety of official and unofficially sanctioned capacities. When there was a call to duty, the United States Armed Forces always relied upon women to be a part of the effort. Women in the United States Military: An Annotated Bibliography is the most complete and up to date listing of resources to help students and scholars understand the effect women have had on the wars that have shaped the United States. Covering everything from the American Revolution to Operations in Iraq, Women in the United States Military is essential for all academic and research libraries.

African American Genealogical Sourcebook

Author: Paula Kay Byers
Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9780810392267
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This text provides historical genealogical data on African Americans. The book includes emigration history, genealogical records specific to African Americans, and a directory of genealogical information.

L A City Limits

Author: Josh Sides
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520248309
Format: PDF, ePub
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A lively history of modern black Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the present.

The Second Line of Defense

Author: Lynn Dumenil
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469631229
Format: PDF, Docs
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In tracing the rise of the modern idea of the American "new woman," Lynn Dumenil examines World War I's surprising impact on women and, in turn, women's impact on the war. Telling the stories of a diverse group of women, including African Americans, dissidents, pacifists, reformers, and industrial workers, Dumenil analyzes both the roadblocks and opportunities they faced. She richly explores the ways in which women helped the United States mobilize for the largest military endeavor in the nation's history. Dumenil shows how women activists staked their claim to loyal citizenship by framing their war work as homefront volunteers, overseas nurses, factory laborers, and support personnel as "the second line of defense." But in assessing the impact of these contributions on traditional gender roles, Dumenil finds that portrayals of these new modern women did not always match with real and enduring change. Extensively researched and drawing upon popular culture sources as well as archival material, The Second Line of Defense offers a comprehensive study of American women and war and frames them in the broader context of the social, cultural, and political history of the era.

African American War Heroes

Author: James B. Martin
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610693663
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Detailed profiles bring stories of African American heroism in the U.S. armed forces to life, from the American Revolution through the conflict in Afghanistan. • Shares 80 detailed biographies of African Americans who earned their nation's highest medals for valor • Covers both well-known and more obscure individuals throughout U.S. military history • Offers 10 sidebars on important African American segregated units and critical events pertaining to African American participation in the military • Includes an introductory essay to provide a conceptual framework for students • Features a fact box at the top of each entry to provide at-a-glance information about the recipient and his/her award(s)

Racism in the Nation s Service

Author: Eric S. Yellin
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607212
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Between the 1880s and 1910s, thousands of African Americans passed civil service exams and became employed in the executive offices of the federal government. However, by 1920, promotions to well-paying federal jobs had nearly vanished for black workers. Eric S. Yellin argues that the Wilson administration's successful 1913 drive to segregate the federal government was a pivotal episode in the age of progressive politics. Yellin investigates how the enactment of this policy, based on Progressives' demands for whiteness in government, imposed a color line on American opportunity and implicated Washington in the economic limitation of African Americans for decades to come. Using vivid accounts of the struggles and protests of African American government employees, Yellin reveals the racism at the heart of the era's reform politics. He illuminates the nineteenth-century world of black professional labor and social mobility in Washington, D.C., and uncovers the Wilson administration's progressive justifications for unraveling that world. From the hopeful days following emancipation to the white-supremacist "normalcy" of the 1920s, Yellin traces the competing political ideas, politicians, and ordinary government workers who created "federal segregation."